So crazy it just might work.

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For most, life is generally weird and bad these days, a state of affairs that certainly lends itself to the consumption of ice cream. Almost inevitably, however, ice cream gives way to annoying freezer burn that can be a real buzzkill for anyone looking to enjoy a fleeting moment of bliss. Fittingly, perhaps the only rational response a world turned upside-down is to turn our ice cream upside-down as well.

At least that's the advice that Ben & Jerry's gave to those looking to enjoy a pint of the good stuff without worrying about pesky freezer burn. While their post from a while back details six methods to avoid the scourge of every ice cream eater, probably the most unorthodox method is to—yes—flip your pints upside-down and store them that way.

"This trick is a little risky (and potentially messy, so ensure you have a tightly fitting lid before attempting," reads the preface of their instruction to "flip your partially melted pint upside down before refreezing."

A hand holding Ben & Jerry's Chocolate Fudge Brownie ice cream
Credit: NEWSCAST/GETTY IMAGES

To understand why this crazy technique works, you have to know the enemy that is freezer burn. Essentially, freezer burn happens when ice evaporates and is replaced by moisture-laden air that refreezes on the top of your ice cream. By flipping your pint over, any melted ice cream drips onto the lid rather than the still-good portion of your ice cream, meaning it would freeze on the lid instead thanks to a little thing called gravity.

If you're not ready to commit to the flip, you might find some of Ben & Jerry's five other solutions to be a bit more practical. They include turning your freezer temperature down to prevent melting (since the best ice cream temp is literally sub-zero), placing it in the back of the fridge to keep it colder.

It's also worth pointing out the best way to deal with freezer burn is to prevent it from happening in the first place by simply eating an entire pint at once. Better safe than sorry.

This article originally appeared on MyRecipes.com.