Here is a recipe for springerle I have had for over 30 years.

Jan
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Ingredients

36
Original recipe yields 36 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Beat egg whites. Add sifted powdered sugar and beaten egg yolks. Beat for 15 minutes (!)

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  • Sift cake flour with baking powder and salt.

  • When you roll them out, use just enough flour to roll easily. Roll lightly to 1/4 or 1/2 inch thickness and press design into dough with a well-floured 'Springerle' rolling pin - but don't go all the way through the dough. (The rolling pin has designs cut into it. They sell them in specialty stores.)

  • Butter a cookie sheet and then sprinkle it with anise seed. Cut each section apart carefully and transfer the cookies to the sheet.

  • Let stand overnight to set the design. Otherwise, they sort of melt into themselves.

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (180 degrees C).

  • Bake for 15 minutes. Do not brown. Springerles are hard at first, but if you store them in a bread box they become tender.

Nutrition Facts

113.5 calories; 1.9 g protein; 25.1 g carbohydrates; 22.8 mg cholesterol; 37.2 mg sodium. Full Nutrition

Reviews (5)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
12/13/2007
I made a double batch and at first it seemed too soft to roll out. I let it sit for about an hour and it was fine. I rolled some of them a little too thick the first time and they didn't puff up evenly. The rest were rolled about 1/4 inch thick before I rolled them with the springerle rolling pin and they came out great. Read More
(11)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 1 stars
12/26/2002
Incomplete directions - The dog won't even eat them! Look like biscuits. Taste like cough syrup. Need to improve this- a lot! Read More
(4)
5 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 2
  • 4 star values: 2
  • 3 star values: 0
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 1 star values: 1
Rating: 5 stars
12/12/2007
I made a double batch and at first it seemed too soft to roll out. I let it sit for about an hour and it was fine. I rolled some of them a little too thick the first time and they didn't puff up evenly. The rest were rolled about 1/4 inch thick before I rolled them with the springerle rolling pin and they came out great. Read More
(11)
Rating: 5 stars
12/30/2002
This recipe is almost exactly the one I use that was handed down to me through my mother from my German grandmother and probably her mother. Read More
(8)
Rating: 4 stars
12/06/2004
The person who left the previous review must not have had springerle before. Springerle is a hard cookie that is very good for dunking; however they will soften up over time. I find this to be a very good recipe. Read More
(7)
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Rating: 4 stars
12/21/2009
Any recipe that uses anise oil will have a black licorice taste. A springerle is a subtle sweet biscuit German in origin. It does tend to be drier than what most Americans are use to in a sweet. As a previous review suggested placing it in a storage container will soften it. Read More
(6)
Rating: 1 stars
12/26/2002
Incomplete directions - The dog won't even eat them! Look like biscuits. Taste like cough syrup. Need to improve this- a lot! Read More
(4)