An elderly lady residing in Turkey served this to a friend of ours while he was in that country several years ago. She has since passed away, but her recipe lives on. It is the best Borscht recipe I've ever enjoyed. Serve topped with sour cream, extra dill weed, chopped fresh tomatoes.

Puma
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Ingredients

8
Original recipe yields 8 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Place sliced potatoes and beets in a medium saucepan over high heat; cover with stock, and boil until vegetables are tender. Remove potatoes and beets with a slotted spoon, and reserve stock.

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  • Melt butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Stir in onions, caraway seeds, and salt; cook until onions become soft and translucent. Then stir in celery, carrots, and cabbage. Mix in reserved stock; cook, covered, until all vegetables are tender, about 10 minutes.

  • Add potatoes and beets to the skillet. Season with black pepper and dill weed. Stir in cider vinegar, honey, and tomato puree. Cover, reduce heat to medium low, and simmer at least 30 minutes. Serve topped with sour cream, extra dill weed, and chopped fresh tomatoes.

Nutrition Facts

127.7 calories; 3 g protein; 19.8 g carbohydrates; 10.8 mg cholesterol; 908 mg sodium. Full Nutrition

Reviews (174)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
12/02/2009
Don't let anyone sway you from trying this recipe. My mother was born and raised in Russia, I have friends here in the U.S. who are immigrants from the Ukraine and every one of them makes their borscht a little differently. If you are on a quest for "authentic" borscht like it is the holy grail, good luck - there are many interpretations. I tried this one because I am not pigeonholed into one type. An open mind will yield many good things. This was an EXCELLENT dish. Very clean, very delicious. It has that ethnic taste you are looking for when you want borscht. Who cares what it's called? I loved it and will make it again and again. Thank you for sharing this! Read More
(230)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 1 stars
01/17/2006
Don't even bother. This is NOT borscht. I lived in Ukraine and Russia and married a native Ukrainian. If you're looking for authentic Russian borscht keep looking and pass this one by. Read More
(96)
227 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 168
  • 4 star values: 42
  • 3 star values: 12
  • 2 star values: 2
  • 1 star values: 3
Rating: 5 stars
12/02/2009
Don't let anyone sway you from trying this recipe. My mother was born and raised in Russia, I have friends here in the U.S. who are immigrants from the Ukraine and every one of them makes their borscht a little differently. If you are on a quest for "authentic" borscht like it is the holy grail, good luck - there are many interpretations. I tried this one because I am not pigeonholed into one type. An open mind will yield many good things. This was an EXCELLENT dish. Very clean, very delicious. It has that ethnic taste you are looking for when you want borscht. Who cares what it's called? I loved it and will make it again and again. Thank you for sharing this! Read More
(230)
Rating: 1 stars
01/17/2006
Don't even bother. This is NOT borscht. I lived in Ukraine and Russia and married a native Ukrainian. If you're looking for authentic Russian borscht keep looking and pass this one by. Read More
(96)
Rating: 5 stars
12/13/2008
Well, either the little old lady from Turkey bought the "Moosewood Cookbook" by Mollie Katzen, or Mollie borrowed the recipe from the little old lady. In any event, this is the Russian Cabbage Borscht recipe from the "Moosewood Cookbook" (with some minor variations) and, I agree, it is delicious. Read More
(63)
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Rating: 5 stars
10/18/2006
This is the MOST AWESOME and the most delicious Borcht that I have ever tasted such a brilliant recipe. The cider vinegar and the little bit of honey really does give it something special! Well done it tastes just like my grandma and grandpa would make!! Well done and thanks! Cheers Kate Read More
(58)
Rating: 5 stars
11/26/2016
Being Russian myself I have a courage to say this is a great borscht recipe with Russian flavor. Believe me. Remember the main thing: there is not the one authentic borscht recipe every single family make this dish on its own way. There are thousand variations and interpretations of this dish. We have the main ingredients - beets cabbage (not exactly red you can easily use a regular white cabbage) potatoes carrots and onions. And then use your imagination. Some people make borscht using pork or beef some add mushrooms I ve heard of even adding prunes. As to this recipe I would change the proportions a little just for my taste. I would use 1 1/2 cups beets only one large onion and less tomato puree (tomatoes are optional but the borscht will be tastier). Don t substitute cumin for caraway seeds. Cumin has an oriental flavor that can ruin Russian flavor in borscht. If you don t have caraway seeds just omit them they are optional. And definitely serve the borscht with sour cream very traditional. The borscht consistency ends on your personal preference if you prefer thick add less water or more vegetables if you prefer watery add more water. So if you want to try Russian borscht this is a great recipe to start. Read More
(37)
Rating: 5 stars
06/16/2008
I'd never made Borscht before, but my Russian fiance was begging me to give it a try. So, I made this recipe and he LOVED it. I did add some beef and change the veggie broth/water to beef broth. I also put in red wine instead of cider vinegar. Lastly, I used chopped steamed tomatoes instead of pureed tomatoes because I like the texture better. And I probably put in way more dill than it called for. It was amazing. Read More
(37)
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Rating: 5 stars
06/01/2008
For those of you who have trouble with your beets still being hard try grating the beets for the soup rather than dicing them that's how my Baba did it. Read More
(31)
Rating: 5 stars
06/08/2006
I made this and loved it. It was my first time making borscht also but I've eaten plenty and this rates with the best. The dill and caraway really make the flavour - I left out the honey and didn't miss it. There's probably a different borscht recipe for every town in eastern Europe. Who cares? It's the taste that matters! Read More
(30)
Rating: 5 stars
04/03/2006
This is a really yummy soup. Hearty flavorful- who cares if it's not "authentic"? I've traveled in Russia and several republics and it had just the taste I remember except a little thicker (I did add some more liquid to this one) and sweeter. I didn't have caraway seeds so that might have given it a nice pungent offset to the sweet. I would probably just put in a teaspoon of honey or no honey if you've got nice fresh beets and cabbage. I used Hungarian paprika to season it and that was very nice. Read More
(25)