Originally from my grandma's recipe box, the secret of this delectable Christmas treasure is found in the ground cloves and chicken seasoning. We've always made our tourtieres en grand (in large quantity), as they freeze great making them a terrific quick fix throughout the busy holiday season!

Recipe Summary

prep:
25 mins
cook:
30 mins
additional:
50 mins
total:
1 hr 45 mins
Servings:
64
Yield:
8 tourtieres
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Ingredients

64
Original recipe yields 64 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).

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  • In a large pot, mix the pork, beef, onion, and water. Season with salt, pepper, allspice, cloves, cinnamon, and chicken seasoning. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer 30 minutes.

  • Drain liquid from pot into a bowl. Transfer remaining meat mixture to a separate bowl and chill until ready to use. Place bowl with liquid in the refrigerator and chill 1 hour, or until fat has congealed on the surface.

  • Scrape and discard fat from the chilled liquid. Spoon the meat mixture into pie crusts. Add 1 tablespoon of reserved liquid to each pie. (This prevents them from becoming to dry.) Place top crust on top of each pie and pinch edges to seal. Cut slits in top crust so steam can escape.

  • Bake in preheated oven until golden brown, about 50 minutes. Serve immediately or freeze until ready to use.

To re-heat baked tourtieres

Place dabs of butter on vent holes in pastry. Cover edges of tourtiere with aluminum foil, and re-heat at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 20 minutes, or until heated through.

Nutrition Facts

468 calories; protein 22.7g 46% DV; carbohydrates 23.1g 8% DV; fat 31g 48% DV; cholesterol 71.3mg 24% DV; sodium 588.2mg 24% DV. Full Nutrition

Reviews (70)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
04/08/2008
Liquid chicken seasoning is not chicken stock. It's like liquid bouillon (concentrated chicken broth). It should be with the regular bouillon in your grocery store. Read More
(146)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 2 stars
11/11/2010
this was fantastico but i did add some mashed potatoes to it.. Merci!! Read More
(5)
81 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 56
  • 4 star values: 17
  • 3 star values: 4
  • 2 star values: 3
  • 1 star values: 1
Rating: 5 stars
04/08/2008
Liquid chicken seasoning is not chicken stock. It's like liquid bouillon (concentrated chicken broth). It should be with the regular bouillon in your grocery store. Read More
(146)
Rating: 5 stars
09/15/2010
This is a great great recipe. The flavor is just amazing. My only advice is DON'T make the full recipe! I did and it took me days. Yes I now have 7 tourtiere's in my freezer for the winter but I almost lost my mind too! I now cook a manageable 3 at a time. (24 servings.) The smells and flavors of this dish make it the perfect fall or winter meal. Thank you so much for sharing! Read More
(83)
Rating: 5 stars
01/24/2007
This was very much like my mother used to make-seasoning is fantstic. I cut the recipe 'way down and used some ground turkey to lower the fat content- still great! One question though- what is liquid chicken seasoning? -I asked Allrecipes- and they thought it was chicken stock - is that right??? Read More
(29)
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Rating: 5 stars
11/09/2009
Being of French Canadian descent pork pies were a traditional meal on Christmas Eve. My Meme is long gone now and her recipe. This is dead on to what I remember in my childhood. the only thing I added was mashed potatoes to bind the filing. Other than that its a keeper. Serve with pickled beets and enjoy!! Read More
(27)
Rating: 4 stars
01/05/2010
The liquid chicken seasoning I use is Knorr's Bovril which is a bouillon concentrate. Available in Canada although I don't know about the USofA. Read More
(26)
Rating: 5 stars
02/24/2010
This is the authentic recipe for tortiere a la Quebecois. It had been several years since I had enjoyed this traditional Christmas Eve fare prepared by my mother-in-law in Laval Quebec and it tasted just as I remembered it. French Canadians usually add a dollup of ketchup on the side when served at least my in-laws did. Somehow the spices come alive with the addition. This is as French Canadian as it gets. For a moister pie use twice as much ground pork as ground beef in your recipe and try a dab of ketchup on the side. Read More
(21)
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Rating: 5 stars
09/04/2008
Hi Kathleen. This recipe probably comes the closest to the recipe that my grandmother told me about almost thirty years ago. Yours is the only one to have alspice in it that I've seen on the internet. My earliest and fondest memories was my Ma Mere making meat pies on Saturday mornings at 5 o'clock in preparation for the annual get together of the "family" on Saturday night. Meat pie was a weekend experience to sober up the men prior to driving home. Had it on Christmas but never associated the pie with it. The "meat" that was left over went into plastic containers to be eaten on top of toasted bread with bananas in the morning. I'll try your Tourtiere to see how close it comes to my Grandmother's and hope it does! I've missed a good piece of meat pie for a very long time! Merci! Read More
(21)
Rating: 5 stars
11/12/2008
This is awesome. My first time making it and it tasted just like what I'm used to. The only changes I made were to scale the recipe to 2 pies add 2 potatoes boiled then mashed and I made my own concentrated chicken liquid. I will be making this again soon. Read More
(18)
Rating: 5 stars
05/24/2010
Bovril was made in Canada. We heard the USDA restricted all imports of products containing any beef ingredients from Canada to the US due to the Mad Cow scare. As this item contained some beef ingredient it is no longer available in the US.Best Substitute is "Better than Bouillon" but eliminate the salt called for in recipe or it will be too salty Read More
(16)
Rating: 2 stars
11/11/2010
this was fantastico but i did add some mashed potatoes to it.. Merci!! Read More
(5)