Rating: 4.46 stars
204 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 124
  • 4 star values: 62
  • 3 star values: 11
  • 2 star values: 2
  • 1 star values: 5

This is a very flavorful Indian rice pudding. It's the best rice pudding I've ever had, and very easy to make!

Recipe Summary test

prep:
10 mins
cook:
25 mins
total:
35 mins
Servings:
4
Yield:
4 servings
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Ingredients

4
Original recipe yields 4 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Bring the coconut milk, milk and sugar to a boil in a large saucepan. Add Basmati rice, and simmer over low heat until the mixture thickens and the rice is tender, about 20 minutes.

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  • Stir in the raisins, cardamom and rose water, and cook for a few more minutes. Ladle into serving bowls, and garnish with almonds and pistachios.

Nutrition Facts

513 calories; protein 11.3g; carbohydrates 48.2g; fat 33.4g; cholesterol 9.8mg; sodium 98.6mg. Full Nutrition
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Reviews (151)

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 4 stars
04/09/2008
The quantities and times are accurate for this recipe. Kheer is not as thick as a Western-style rice pudding, and should be still be a bit fluid when cool. Often I have used substitutions in this recipe, depending on what I had on hand. Instead of ground cardamom, I use about 12 - 15 green cardamom pods (I like my cardamom!). The pods should go in with the milk to get the best flavour, and be fished out after cooking. Instead of sugar, I like to put in about a quarter of a small can of sweetened condensed milk. Instead of rose water, I add about 1/4 tsp of almond extract (and sometimes some vanilla extract). Unsweetened flaked coconut is another great addition or garnish. Chopped (and roasted/toasted) almonds, pistachios, and walnuts are delicious garnishes. Kheer is delicious warm or cold. When cooking the rice, I leave the pot uncovered and watch it carefully so it doesn't burn or boil over. Read More
(325)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 3 stars
02/26/2005
I' give you three and a half if I could. While it does taste yummy, and was easy to make it's still a little off from the other kheer. To the other person who responded, Kheer is what could be considered like american rice pudding. It is not anywhere near as thick or super sweet as the american version. This can be served hot or cold. (though I like it at room temp) Read More
(18)
204 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 124
  • 4 star values: 62
  • 3 star values: 11
  • 2 star values: 2
  • 1 star values: 5
Rating: 4 stars
04/09/2008
The quantities and times are accurate for this recipe. Kheer is not as thick as a Western-style rice pudding, and should be still be a bit fluid when cool. Often I have used substitutions in this recipe, depending on what I had on hand. Instead of ground cardamom, I use about 12 - 15 green cardamom pods (I like my cardamom!). The pods should go in with the milk to get the best flavour, and be fished out after cooking. Instead of sugar, I like to put in about a quarter of a small can of sweetened condensed milk. Instead of rose water, I add about 1/4 tsp of almond extract (and sometimes some vanilla extract). Unsweetened flaked coconut is another great addition or garnish. Chopped (and roasted/toasted) almonds, pistachios, and walnuts are delicious garnishes. Kheer is delicious warm or cold. When cooking the rice, I leave the pot uncovered and watch it carefully so it doesn't burn or boil over. Read More
(325)
Rating: 4 stars
05/22/2008
My husband had 5 male guest from India and I made this dish for them. The guys recommendations; don't need to use coconut milk, use whole milk and not any low fat milk, need to cook a lot longer- about an hour. You can tell the rice is done when if you take a piece out and you should be able to smoosh it easily with your finger. I have more of a sweet tooth and I tried while cooking before I added the raisins and cardamom and loved it. I bet kids would like it also before the raisins, cardamom and rose water is added. Read More
(156)
Rating: 4 stars
10/01/2005
This recipe makes very nice kheer. The coconut milk is a creative addition that really enhanced the flavor. The liquid-to-rice ratio was perfect in the finished dessert, with the rice swimming in the delicately sweet, creamy base. This is a recipe I will enjoy making again. Read More
(91)
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Rating: 4 stars
03/17/2010
I'm an Indian originally from Delhi. My mom is Bengali and Bengali's are OBSESSED with rice. And potatoes, too, but that is irrelevant. I agree with an earlier reviewer: coconut milk is not needed, at all, and yes the cooking time is longer; takes more than an hour when we make kheer at hom! and the BEST part about kheer is that it is traditionally served CHILLED. Once the kheer is cooked, take it off the stove, and let it cool down to room temperature, THEN you have to refrigerate it. There's very few milk-based Indian puddings that are served warm, and kheer is definitely not one of them. Read More
(84)
Rating: 5 stars
02/23/2011
Excellent recipe. My fiance, who is from India, absolutely loved it. Just a couple of things to keep in mind, however: Don't be surprised if you find yourself waiting for about 45 minutes or so before the pudding actually thickens. The suggested 20 minutes is a little short. Also, be careful not to overcook it. Kheer is supposed to be more watery than typical rice pudding, so don't panic! And it may appear at first that 1/2 cup of Basmati rice is not enough compared to all of the liquid needed, but it is actually perfect; don't add extra rice, or else it'll be too thick! I hope my suggestions helped! Read More
(41)
Rating: 5 stars
12/06/2005
This was awesome! I made a coupke changes, however: I did not use the rose water, and I made the dish vegan by substituting the milk with vanilla rice milk, and also used only half of the coconut milk, substituting soy coffee creamer for the other half. I toasted the nuts in a dry pan before adding them to the mixture which I think really brought out the flavor. When I served it, I dusted the bowls with just a tiny pinch of nutmeg. This went over REALLY well at the food co-op where I cook for the masses. Read More
(38)
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Rating: 4 stars
03/10/2007
kheer is supposed to be more liquid-y than traditional rice puddings! It's not meant to feel like a log sitting in your stomach. Read More
(36)
Rating: 5 stars
01/10/2008
OH Yesssssss......... let me start with saying I have never had any type of rice pudding before. This is my very first experience with making and tasting rice pudding. W@W this was so good so creamy and geez so tasty. I am NOW a HUGE fan of rice pudding, I did follow recipe except for I added just about 1/4 cup more rice, a tad bit more of the cardamom, becuase I really love this spice, and topped my serving with toasted walnuts and toasted coconut flakes, this to me is super delicous:) Thank you so much for a great treat! Now my tummy is all warm inside;) Read More
(29)
Rating: 4 stars
11/03/2008
Don't be put off by the texture of this pudding! Kheer is the original rice pudding, which became part of western cuisine through the British. I like this, but my husband and son didn't (too 'spicy' for them). I didn't have enough coconut milk, so I used more 1% milk than called for. The flavour is nice and somewhat creamy (would have been better and creamier with the proper proportion of coconut milk). I used a little more rose water and cardamom than stated, used sultana raisins, and added a pinch of cinnamon. Other tips: cook the rice as long as it takes for it to become porridge-like in consistency. After refrigerating the leftovers, the kheer thickens up, so you might want to add a bit of milk. Read More
(22)
Rating: 3 stars
02/26/2005
I' give you three and a half if I could. While it does taste yummy, and was easy to make it's still a little off from the other kheer. To the other person who responded, Kheer is what could be considered like american rice pudding. It is not anywhere near as thick or super sweet as the american version. This can be served hot or cold. (though I like it at room temp) Read More
(18)