This recipe is for the good fudge. The one without nuts or creams. This fudge doesn't use any shortcuts either, so use a candy thermometer for best results.

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Recipe Summary

prep:
15 mins
cook:
30 mins
total:
45 mins
Servings:
50
Yield:
50 squares
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Ingredients

50
Original recipe yields 50 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • In a medium saucepan, stir together the cocoa powder, sugar and salt. Mix in corn syrup, and milk until well blended. Add butter, and heat to between 234 and 240 degrees F (112 to 116 degrees C), or until a small amount of syrup dropped into cold water forms a soft ball that flattens when removed from the water and placed on a flat surface. Stir occasionally.

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  • Remove from heat, and beat with a wooden spoon until the mixture is thick and loses its gloss. Stir in vanilla, and pour into a buttered 9x9 inch baking dish. Let cool until set. Cut into small squares to serve.

Nutrition Facts

41 calories; protein 0.3g; carbohydrates 9g; fat 0.7g; cholesterol 1.6mg; sodium 17.4mg. Full Nutrition
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Reviews (34)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
10/05/2011
This is a recipe my family made in the 1950's and 60's. It has great texture much better than more modern fudge recipes but is less predictable. Let the mixture cool slowly in the pan without stirring until you can let your hand rest comfortably on the bottom of the pan for 10-15 seconds then proceed with beating the mixture as recommended. Have your pan prepped and ready to pour-the change from glossy to non-glossy is subtle; it may take a few tries to get the timing perfect. Read More
(88)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 1 stars
11/20/2006
I wish i would have read reviews and fudge tips before making this one. it turned out like candy brittle.I was not happy espec 4 the holidays. i also found this tip here in "flawless fudge" tips. now if i would have read it sooner maybe it would have turned out better. =================== Once the fudge reaches soft-ball stage 240 degrees F (115 degrees C) DO NOT stir it or even shake the pan until it has cooled to about 110 degrees F (43 degrees C). Read More
(136)
40 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 21
  • 4 star values: 8
  • 3 star values: 3
  • 2 star values: 3
  • 1 star values: 5
Rating: 1 stars
11/20/2006
I wish i would have read reviews and fudge tips before making this one. it turned out like candy brittle.I was not happy espec 4 the holidays. i also found this tip here in "flawless fudge" tips. now if i would have read it sooner maybe it would have turned out better. =================== Once the fudge reaches soft-ball stage 240 degrees F (115 degrees C) DO NOT stir it or even shake the pan until it has cooled to about 110 degrees F (43 degrees C). Read More
(136)
Rating: 5 stars
10/05/2011
This is a recipe my family made in the 1950's and 60's. It has great texture much better than more modern fudge recipes but is less predictable. Let the mixture cool slowly in the pan without stirring until you can let your hand rest comfortably on the bottom of the pan for 10-15 seconds then proceed with beating the mixture as recommended. Have your pan prepped and ready to pour-the change from glossy to non-glossy is subtle; it may take a few tries to get the timing perfect. Read More
(88)
Rating: 4 stars
05/27/2005
I make a variation of this using canned milk, instead of corn syrup and whole milk and only 1 teaspoon of vanilla. I think its much better than the marshmellow creme type. The trick is it has to be taken off at the correct temp (I use the soft ball method in some water) partially fill the sink with cold water and place the pan in the sink add vanilla and butter and beat (its an arm workout)till glossy. Immediately put into pan lined with wax paper. It will turn like rock if you beat it too long. Also this doesn't harden in moist weather. Go figure! Read More
(67)
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Rating: 5 stars
11/10/2006
I've been looking for an old fashioned fudge recipe like my mom used to make. The only thing I could ever find was with the marshmallow and stuff. It was good but not what I wanted. This is great... Read More
(33)
Rating: 5 stars
12/12/2007
This is recipe my grandmother used except she preferred evaporated milk. Fudge is smooth and creamy if you don't over-cook it. You can't beat(stir)it too much. The more you stir the creamier the fudge. I add 1 cup of peanut butter with the vanilla. If cooked correctly THIS IS TRUE FUDGE! Thank you!!! Read More
(28)
Rating: 5 stars
10/09/2006
Delicious! Best I have ever made. Cooked absolutely perfect. Poor quickly from boiler to pan though - thickens fast! Yummy! Read More
(20)
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Rating: 5 stars
12/16/2004
I liked this recipe. Fudge is easy to 'fudge' but I got this to turn out great just like when I was a kid. Read More
(20)
Rating: 5 stars
12/04/2008
Just like great granma use to make...Thank you SOOOO Much!!! Read More
(18)
Rating: 5 stars
12/17/2012
I love this kind of fudge. In my opinion the other stuff with marshmellow creme isn't really fudge. The problem I've had with this is beating it after it's reached the softball stage and cooled. It takes some major arm strengh and endurance! Some hints in working with this kind of fudge: Sift the sugar and cocoa together before mixing it with the other ingredients it'll blend better with no cocoa lumps; butter the sides of the pan use a heavy-guage sauce pan. Do not disturb the fudge once it starts to "roll" boil. Using corn syrup AND sugar helps to keep the sugar from crystallizing and ruining the entire batch. If the fudge is grainy after it's cooled-crystalization of the sugar is the culprit. Don't scrape the sides of the pan as the fudge cooks that can also be dangerous-if you have one sugar crystal on the side and it gets into the fudge it will ruin it. Once the fudge starts to thicken (as you're beating it) and loses it high gloss THAT is the time to get it into a buttered pan. ALSO do NOT use one of those spray products to grease the sides of your cooking pot there is something in the product that will keep your fudge from thickening. I've learned all these hints from mistakes I've made. Good luck. This is definitely worth the effort! Read More
(17)
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