This is a traditional recipe good for anything that ails you. It's the absolute best when you've got the flu, and it's great the second and third day. Note, these matzoh balls are 'sinkers'. These are traditional matzoh balls, as this recipe was passed down from my great-grandmother who needed to make them as heavy as possible to feed a hungry family during lean times. Cut the matzoh meal by 1/2 cup to lighten the load.

Layla
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Ingredients

8
Original recipe yields 8 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified

Directions

  • Place the chicken into a large pot with the breast side down. Fill with enough cold water to reach about 3 inches from the top of the pot. Add the onion, carrot, parsnip, celery and dill. Bring to a simmer over medium heat, and cook, partially covered for 2 hours. Do not let the soup boil. Skim any fat from the top of the soup, and add the garlic cloves. Partially cover, and simmer for another 2 hours for best flavor.

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  • In a medium bowl, mix together the matzo meal, eggs, oil, salt, and 1/4 cup of the broth from the chicken soup. Refrigerate for about 20 minutes to set up.

  • Bring a separate pot of water to a rolling boil. Roll the matzo mixture into about 16 balls. Wet your hands to keep the dough from sticking to them. Drop the balls into boiling water, cover, and cook for about 35 minutes.

  • While the matzo balls are cooking, strain the broth from the chicken soup. Return the broth to the pot. Remove the bones and skin from the chicken and cut into pieces. Return to the soup, or leave the soup as a broth, and reserve the chicken for other uses. Remove the matzo balls from the water, and serve in the hot chicken soup.

Nutrition Facts

525 calories; 27.2 g total fat; 212 mg cholesterol; 721 mg sodium. 39.5 g carbohydrates; 32.1 g protein; Full Nutrition

Reviews (60)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
06/30/2010
Great recipe although in our family we never add garlic. Dill weed and parsnip go into the soup in Eastern Europe it's the version I grew up with. To make the process a little easier simply tie up a bunch of dill (I also add parsley) and drop into the pot. Same for onion -- no need to chop. Peel it pierce with a knife in a couple of spots and drop it in. Discard boiled dill and onion when done. Garnish the soup with fresh chopped dill. Read More
(97)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 3 stars
07/06/2009
I don't know what region the author is from but in the south we Jews use the following ingredients for REAL Jewish chicken soup: cut-up chicken carrots celery and onions. parsnips and dill weed? No way! Of course the matzoh balls are great. I like your recipe for them. Thanks. Read More
(62)
72 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 54
  • 4 star values: 12
  • 3 star values: 3
  • 2 star values: 1
  • 1 star values: 2
Rating: 5 stars
06/30/2010
Great recipe although in our family we never add garlic. Dill weed and parsnip go into the soup in Eastern Europe it's the version I grew up with. To make the process a little easier simply tie up a bunch of dill (I also add parsley) and drop into the pot. Same for onion -- no need to chop. Peel it pierce with a knife in a couple of spots and drop it in. Discard boiled dill and onion when done. Garnish the soup with fresh chopped dill. Read More
(97)
Rating: 5 stars
06/30/2010
Great recipe although in our family we never add garlic. Dill weed and parsnip go into the soup in Eastern Europe it's the version I grew up with. To make the process a little easier simply tie up a bunch of dill (I also add parsley) and drop into the pot. Same for onion -- no need to chop. Peel it pierce with a knife in a couple of spots and drop it in. Discard boiled dill and onion when done. Garnish the soup with fresh chopped dill. Read More
(97)
Rating: 3 stars
07/05/2009
I don't know what region the author is from but in the south we Jews use the following ingredients for REAL Jewish chicken soup: cut-up chicken carrots celery and onions. parsnips and dill weed? No way! Of course the matzoh balls are great. I like your recipe for them. Thanks. Read More
(62)
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Rating: 5 stars
06/02/2006
Thankyou soo much Layla for this recipe Ive had the flu for a couple of days and was feeling really down all I could think of was having some of my Auntie sephfa's chicken matza ball soup that she had last made me as a teenager in desperation I looked on the internet and found laylas great recipe I followed It to the letter (even had my husband drive the 40 kms to nearest big town to find Matzo meal and Dill we live on a property out of town)Its been 30 odd years since I was a teen but I still recognise the taste.Laylas soup did the trick and yes putting less meal in the matzo balls does make them float fed it to all n my family last night all enjoyed it and Im feeling a lot better today so thankyou again Layla and God bless you keep cooking and sharing recipes Love Sebria (Little Hartley N.S W.Australia Read More
(61)
Rating: 5 stars
10/25/2007
This is a staple for me I have made this soup many times! (I have yet to make the matzo balls I have my own recipe for dumplings & make mine differently.) But the method & and ingred. for the broth are perfection---really warms you up on a cold Autumn day! Thanks so much for posting this recipe! Read More
(24)
Rating: 5 stars
11/11/2007
I made this for my sick husband and he declared that he was feeling "much better" right after having two bowls. The only change that I made was I boiled the chicken first in water threw out the water (this way I got rid of a lot of the chicken fat and other "stuff" that comes out when you first cook the chicken and then I started with step one per the recipe as written. Really delicious and a definite addition to our family recipe book! Read More
(23)
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Rating: 5 stars
04/03/2007
perfect chicken soup recipe yet no great Jew would ever add parsnips never and I love this recipe and use it all the time as I am an old practicing jew of old. Read More
(22)
Rating: 4 stars
04/05/2012
I came across this recipe searching for matzo ball recipes since I wanted to try making them from scratch vs. a mix. I haven't made them yet but wanted to comment on the soup recipe. It's interesting to read what others put in their soup. My Russian Jewish Great Grandma made hers with whole chicken celery parsnips turnips carrots onions dill and "flanken" (I later learned that flanken = short ribs). You only use a few pieces of the short ribs to give it some added depth & flavor. For me dill is the most important ingredient for without it it simply doesn't taste like Jewish Chicken soup. It comes down to what you're used to or what you grew up with. Read More
(16)
Rating: 5 stars
02/10/2007
This was very tasty soup. I couldn't find matzo meal at the store so I used my standard dumpling recipe. It was still very good. Thanks! Read More
(12)
Rating: 5 stars
10/15/2010
In Israel practically everyone uses dill weed and it is wonderful! Read More
(12)