A traditional mint jelly made from fresh mint.

Recipe Summary

Servings:
32
Yield:
4 1/2 pint jars
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Ingredients

32
Original recipe yields 32 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Rinse off the mint leaves, and place them into a large saucepan. Crush with a potato masher or the bottom of a jar or glass. Add water, and bring the mint to a boil. Remove from heat, cover, and let stand for 10 minutes. Strain, and measure out 1 2/3 cups of the mint.

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  • Place 1 2/3 cups mint into a saucepan. Stir in the lemon juice and food coloring. Mix in the sugar, and place the pan over high heat. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Once the mixture is boiling, stir in the pectin. Boil the mixture for a full minute while stirring constantly. Remove from heat, and skim foam off the top using a large metal spoon. Transfer the mixture to hot sterile jars, and seal.

  • Place a rack in the bottom of a large stockpot and fill halfway with water. Bring to a boil over high heat, then carefully lower the jars into the pot using a holder. Leave a 2 inch space between the jars. Pour in more boiling water if necessary until the water level is at least 1 inch above the tops of the jars. Bring the water to a full boil, cover the pot, and process for 10 minutes.

Nutrition Facts

86 calories; protein 0g; carbohydrates 22.1g 7% DV; fat 0g; cholesterol 0mg; sodium 0.8mg. Full Nutrition
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Reviews (49)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
07/02/2008
Very good recipe. IF this is your first attempt at jelly making make sure you read the directions like 3x before you even pull out jars. When this recipe says to strain 1 2/3 cup of mint, it means the juice not the leaves, by the way. Read More
(448)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 1 stars
12/21/2003
Having been a novice at this jelly making business, I misread the instructions regarding the pectin amount. It calls for 1/2 (6 oz.) of pectin. I put in 6 oz.instead of the implied 3 oz. Why not just say 3 oz.s???? Pectin comes in 2-3oz. packages. Needless say mine did not setup. Now to start over again with the Certo recipe. Read More
(280)
53 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 30
  • 4 star values: 12
  • 3 star values: 2
  • 2 star values: 4
  • 1 star values: 5
Rating: 5 stars
07/02/2008
Very good recipe. IF this is your first attempt at jelly making make sure you read the directions like 3x before you even pull out jars. When this recipe says to strain 1 2/3 cup of mint, it means the juice not the leaves, by the way. Read More
(448)
Rating: 1 stars
12/21/2003
Having been a novice at this jelly making business, I misread the instructions regarding the pectin amount. It calls for 1/2 (6 oz.) of pectin. I put in 6 oz.instead of the implied 3 oz. Why not just say 3 oz.s???? Pectin comes in 2-3oz. packages. Needless say mine did not setup. Now to start over again with the Certo recipe. Read More
(280)
Rating: 3 stars
11/15/2006
As this was my first attempt of "jelly making" I found the recipe easy to follow, but the end product to be on the sweet side. Maybe 2 cups of sugar should be used or 3 1/2 tablespoon of lemon juice. The choice is yours. Read More
(147)
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Rating: 5 stars
08/19/2006
As a first time maker of mint jelly, I was very pleased to find that this recipe was quick, simple, and made delicious jelly. I used 3oz of pectin and had no problems with it setting. My only suggestion is that if you use Scotch Mint you may want to use a few more drops of dye--I found that 3 were just enough to turn it from brownish-yellow to a nice shade of pale green. Thanks for the recipe! Read More
(54)
Rating: 4 stars
05/31/2011
Yummy! This is just about the same recipe as they have at the National Center for Home Food Preservation. I cut the sugar down a little so it wasn't too sweet. Yes, do make sure you have ALL your "ducks in a row" before you start heating anything - plan ahead. BONUS: Since 2 Tbsp. of lemon juice was just about one lemon, there was a little leftover. There was leftover mint juice, too - so I added the mint juice and lemon juice to a pot of iced green tea I had made. Delish! Mint-mania at our house. Between the jelly & the tea, I knew something good would come out of our surprise mint patch (our mower broke and the lawn was HIDEOUSLY overgrown!) When life breaks your mower, make mint jelly! Read More
(45)
Rating: 5 stars
11/21/2007
This recipe was so easy and came out perfect! I followed the recipe just as it says and had great results. Looks beautiful in the jars. Will make wonderful additions to my Christmas gift baskets. Read More
(39)
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Rating: 5 stars
11/12/2009
First kick at the "Jelly" can and it turned out great. I got a little experimental on the second batch and used pineapple juice instead of water. It is a nice compliment to the mint (especially since I used pineapple mint) and works great if using the jelly as either a condiment on pork/chicken/lamb or as a spread. Read More
(39)
Rating: 4 stars
06/22/2009
I tried this recipe yesterday.I grow my own mint, went out and cut it, washed it and folowed the drections tothe letter. It did not set up as it should have. It i a bit on the runny side. I dumped it. I have no idea what happened. Mommacat Read More
(30)
Rating: 5 stars
06/21/2010
Very easy to make. Set real nice. Loved it in filling for cookies. Made another batch with pineapple mint and used pinapple juice instead of water that was a delite. Read More
(22)
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