Here is how we used to do prime rib at a country club where I cooked 20 at a time every Saturday afternoon.

SWM

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Recipe Summary

prep:
10 mins
cook:
2 hrs
additional:
10 mins
total:
2 hrs 20 mins
Servings:
8
Yield:
8 servings
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Ingredients

8
Original recipe yields 8 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Trim the prime rib roast of excess fat and any connective tissue. Lightly score the entire roast in a criss-cross pattern (about 1/8 inch deep).

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  • Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C). In a small bowl, mix together the kosher salt, garlic powder, and black pepper. Rub the mixture into the roast until it develops a crust. Really pack it on.

  • Place the roast into a roasting pan, and pour water into the bottom of the pan to 1/2 inch deep. Cover the roast with a lid or aluminum foil.

  • Roast in the oven for about 1 1/2 to 2 hours, then check the internal temperature using a meat thermometer. The internal temperature should be at least 145 degrees F (63 degrees C). Hold the roast in an oven at 200 degrees F (110 degrees C) until ready to carve. Let stand for a few minutes before carving if not holding. Put on your silly white hat, set up the buffet carving station, and watch the hungry people line up!

Nutrition Facts

1053 calories; protein 44.9g 90% DV; carbohydrates 1g; fat 95.3g 147% DV; cholesterol 207mg 69% DV; sodium 11534.3mg 481% DV. Full Nutrition
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Reviews (39)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
11/28/2005
I am a chef also and this is a great recipe for prime rib. I would agree with someone elses review about not covering the meat. Two more good tricks is to cover the meat in the salt and a steak seasoning blend then let set over night to soak in the meat. Then after it is baked and sets about 10-15 min. the salt on top has formed a crust then you simply remove the salt crust and it will not be as salty. All that flavor goes into the meat. Read More
(167)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 2 stars
01/28/2007
If you like institutional buffet food this is the prime rib recipe for you. I think prime rib is a far too expensive and special a cut of meat to treat this way. This isn't roasting it's steaming! For a nice medium rare roast season with salt and garlic heat oven to 350 F. Place roast fat side up in shallow roasting pan. Insert ovenproof meat thermometer so tip is centered in thickest part of beef not resting in fat or touching bone. Do not add water or cover. Roast 2-1/4 to 2-1/2 hours for medium rare; 2-3/4 to 3 hours for medium doneness. Thermometer should read 115 degrees for rare when you remove the roast from the oven (temperature will increase about 10 degrees while it stands before carving). Read More
(320)
46 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 21
  • 4 star values: 9
  • 3 star values: 5
  • 2 star values: 3
  • 1 star values: 8
Rating: 2 stars
01/28/2007
If you like institutional buffet food this is the prime rib recipe for you. I think prime rib is a far too expensive and special a cut of meat to treat this way. This isn't roasting it's steaming! For a nice medium rare roast season with salt and garlic heat oven to 350 F. Place roast fat side up in shallow roasting pan. Insert ovenproof meat thermometer so tip is centered in thickest part of beef not resting in fat or touching bone. Do not add water or cover. Roast 2-1/4 to 2-1/2 hours for medium rare; 2-3/4 to 3 hours for medium doneness. Thermometer should read 115 degrees for rare when you remove the roast from the oven (temperature will increase about 10 degrees while it stands before carving). Read More
(320)
Rating: 5 stars
11/28/2005
I am a chef also and this is a great recipe for prime rib. I would agree with someone elses review about not covering the meat. Two more good tricks is to cover the meat in the salt and a steak seasoning blend then let set over night to soak in the meat. Then after it is baked and sets about 10-15 min. the salt on top has formed a crust then you simply remove the salt crust and it will not be as salty. All that flavor goes into the meat. Read More
(167)
Rating: 1 stars
12/28/2003
Please don't spoil a great cut of beef by cooking it like this. It will be either braised or steamed depending on the amount of liquid you use. Prime rib should always be dry roasted. This may be good but not nearly as good as dry roasted on a rack baked slowly. The rub sounds fine though. Read More
(119)
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Rating: 1 stars
12/26/2006
Read the other reviewer comments below before starting this recipe! Mine is just my story.... OK I admit I was dumb and I did not read the reviews before I started this recipe. Halfway through the cooking process I took a peek at the roast and was horrified (in a chef/cook sort of way). The meat was grey looking and I couldn't see how it was going to look any prettier in an hour...this was my Christmas meal and I do like to "present" the meal at the table. So I panicked and decided to read the other comments to this recipe - I do wish I had done so prior to placing the meat in the oven... silly me. I ended up dumping the water uncovering the roast scraping off some of the salt and it came out OK. Some of my guests felt it was a bit salty (especially if you like to eat the crunchy outside of the meat) but I think it was OK -- which is not a good thing with such an expensive cut of meat. If you are consious of the amount of money you spend on a good cut of meat I would stick with the "tired and true" recipe which one of the other folks who commented recaped for us. Read More
(70)
Rating: 1 stars
12/28/2003
I wanted to make my man his favorite meat for his birthday and it turned out HORRIBLE. Whoever said all that kosher salt won't make the meat too salty was lying through their teeth. It smelled good but when it came down to it nobody ate more than a couple of bites not even the dog. I wasted a lot of money on that expensive cut of meat. Read More
(53)
Rating: 1 stars
12/10/2006
Please do not trim the fat from your rib because you will lose a lot of juice and flavor. The idea of the fat is it 'melts' to continuely baste the meat thoughout the cooking time. This recipe also contains way too much salt. Do not add water to the pan and do not cover the meat at all during the cooking time! Read More
(51)
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Rating: 5 stars
12/16/2004
This was excellent! It was my first attempt at making prime rib so I chose a 3 pound roast and cut the seasonings in half. After reviewing many recipes I decided to roast the meat uncovered at 500 degrees for 15 minutes followed by 325 degrees until done (about 1 1/2 hours total). I like my meat medium rare so I removed it when it measured 125 degrees in the center(the temperature will continue to rise). I let it rest for 20 minutes and scraped off the excess salt before carving. For the au jus I used a packet mix which was great however diluting the scraped seasonings with water would have made a nice au jus too. Read More
(38)
Rating: 5 stars
12/27/2003
Awesome!!! I've tried some of the other recipes & this is the only one that tasted the way prime rib is suppose to taste. I followed the recipe exactly the way it was written. My family does not go out for prime rib anymore. They just ask me to cook it. Read More
(29)
Rating: 1 stars
12/09/2005
Way to salty.... and did nothing for the meat would not do serve this again Read More
(24)
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