Rating: 4.67 stars
6 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 5
  • 4 star values: 0
  • 3 star values: 1
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 1 star values: 0

This slow-cooked bone broth uses roasted bones and unpeeled veggies, which produces a much deeper flavor and darker color. For a lighter-colored broth, omit the roasting step and use peeled veggies. The longer this simmers, the richer it gets, however don't go longer than 48 hours as the flavor can turn bitter. Make sure about half your bones are collagen-rich, such as chicken backs, feet, or wings. Season with additional salt, if desired, upon serving.

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Recipe Summary test

prep:
15 mins
cook:
1 hr 30 mins
total:
1 hr 45 mins
Servings:
8
Yield:
8 servings
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Ingredients

8
Original recipe yields 8 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F (200 degrees C).

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  • Place chicken bones, garlic cloves, carrots, celery, and onion on a baking sheet and drizzle with olive oil. Toss to coat.

  • Roast in the preheated oven for 30 minutes, stirring halfway through.

  • Transfer roasted bones and vegetables into a 6-quart slow cooker. Add vinegar, bay leaves, salt, and peppercorns. Cover completely with water and cook on Low for 24 to 48 hours, adding 1 to 2 cups more water during the cooking process, to keep bones submerged.

  • Strain broth using a fine mesh strainer. Pour into jars and refrigerate until ready to use.

Cook's Notes:

I like to save leftover chicken carcasses, bones, and vegetable trimmings in the freezer, and when I have enough I make a batch of broth.

The bone broth should gel upon refrigeration, however if it does not, it is still very nutritious! Just use less water and/or more collagen-rich bones.

To easily remove fat from the broth, refrigerate and remove the hardened layer on top using a spoon. Leaving the layer of fat on top helps seal and preserve the broth.

Nutrition Facts

414 calories; protein 30.1g; carbohydrates 5.5g; fat 29.4g; cholesterol 143mg; sodium 376.4mg. Full Nutrition
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Reviews (4)

6 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 5
  • 4 star values: 0
  • 3 star values: 1
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 1 star values: 0
Rating: 5 stars
02/06/2020
To those wondering how long this lasts....if you let a layer of fat harden on top of the broth, this essentially "seals" the broth from air and it can last several weeks in the fridge. That said, I always use mine up well before then, or I put the extra in the freezer for up to 2-3 months. If your broth isn't sealed with the fat layer, use within 5 days. Read More
(4)
Rating: 5 stars
05/20/2020
This is so easy! I freeze carcasses from rotisserie chicken and make this about once a week. I store in Mason jars in the freezer, leaving an inch of headspace in the jars to allow for expansion as it freezes. I will never buy store chicken broth again!! Read More
(2)
Rating: 5 stars
11/25/2019
Easy since you don't have to mess with the veggies much. Read More
(1)
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Rating: 5 stars
03/09/2021
I was so excited to try to make bone broth. I saved various chicken bones in the freezer then bought chicken feet for the last bit of weight. After starting the recipe, I was thinking this is not worth the time, considering the roasting of the bones...the slow cooker on the counter, saving bones.....So after cooking for 32 hours I didn't have a desire to mess with it too much so I dumped the cooked broth into a large vessel, covered it and placed it in the fridge. It turned to jelly. That's a good thing!....so I have read. No fat on top, which was interesting. I heated it up a couple of days later (to thin it out )so I could distribute into jars, gave it a taste...it was fantastic! I can see why people served this as a soup! It was so deep, rich, and full of flavor and totally worth the effort! I'll save every chicken bone for now on! Read More
Rating: 3 stars
11/02/2021
Actual restaurant chef here, with a sanitation license. Solid technique mostly, but there is no reason to not peel veggies unless you leave yellow onion peels on to color chicken stock. Carrots, celery, onions, and leeks (especially those guys) are usually full of dirt, bugs, and probably ammonium nitrate and pesticides. If you didn't watch a hippie grow it, peel it. And definitely cut the ends off. Garlic can stay unpeeled if you're tossing it after, but that's it. Strain it a second time through cheesecloth while warm or it will be cloudy. And there's no need to cook any kind of stock more than 12 hours or so, even on a very low heat like this. I know "bone broth" has been a great marketing tool lately, but it's literally stock. No established health benefits beyond comfort and a nice wallop of vitamins and minerals. But flavor for days. And please do your research, folks. Collagen is something your body makes. You can't just drink it and have hair and nails like a Kardashian on prom night. As far as stock and soup are concerned, collagen and gelatin from bones and connective tissue contribute flavor and mouthfeel, that's about it. If you want it to be more luxurious and more gelatinous, or if you're trying to make aspic, add an equal amount of beef or chicken feet. No, you don't have to eat them. Unless you've already had a hot dog. But the pros have been doing this for centuries. Read More
Rating: 5 stars
03/17/2020
I tweaked the recipe. According to what ingredients I had. But came out great! Read More
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