In Italy, 'saltimbocca' means 'jumps in the mouth.' This tender, juicy and delicious pork tenderloin is finished with a rich meaty sauce and will certainly please your palate.

Recipe Summary

prep:
20 mins
cook:
1 hr 45 mins
additional:
30 mins
total:
2 hrs 35 mins
Servings:
2
Yield:
2 servings
Advertisement

Ingredients

2
Original recipe yields 2 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist
Stock:

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Remove silvery membrane from surface of the tenderloin with a sharp knife. Reserve the trimmings. Trim off the small "head" pieces of the tenderloin where there is a natural separation; this is optional. Reserve.

    Advertisement
  • Cut tenderloin in half crosswise to make 2 equal portions. Cut each half lengthwise in half to make 4 pieces. Transfer to a bowl; refrigerate while you start the sauce.

  • Chop the reserved trimmings very fine. Melt butter in a pot over medium-high heat until caramelized and nicely browned, 4 or 5 minutes. Stir in broth and gelatin. Stir in water. Cook and stir over medium or medium-low heat at a low simmer until liquid is reduced by half, about 1 1/2 hours. Add more water if it reduces too quickly.

  • Place pork sections between to pieces of plastic wrap. Pound to a thickness of about 1/4 to 1/8 inch thick. Remove top sheet of plastic wrap. Turn each piece over. Sprinkle generously with salt and pepper. Dust very lightly with about 2 teaspoons flour. Flip back over; sprinkle with black pepper only. Press 3 sage leaves onto surface of each piece of pork. Cover completely with prosciutto, cutting or tearing strips to fit. A bit of overlap is okay.

  • Place sheet of plastic wrap back over the pork and pound very lightly to make sure the prosciutto sticks to the pork. Transfer to a plate; cover with plastic wrap. Refrigerate until chilled, at least 30 minutes.

  • Strain pork broth into a bowl.

  • Place skillet over high heat; add olive oil. When olive oil is hot and shimmering, place pork pieces in the oil prosciutto side down. Cook about 3 minutes. Carefully turn pieces and cook another minute. Remove skillet from heat. Transfer pork to warm serving plates.

  • Blot excess oil from skillet with paper towels. Add wine and pork broth. Cook over high heat until mixture thickens and reduces by about half, 4 to 5 minutes.

  • Spoon hot sauce over pork sections.

Chef's Notes:

You can use veal or chicken breasts instead of pork in this recipe.

For a slightly slightly sweet finishing sauce, you can substitute Marsala wine for the dry white wine.

If you don't want to mess around making the fake pork stock with the chopped up trimmings, you can still use the gelatin trick, and simply dissolve a teaspoon into a cup of chicken broth, and reduce it by half. However, the browned scraps do add extra meatiness, and this way you won't have to feel guilty about trimming off too much meat.

Nutrition Facts

552 calories; protein 48.9g; carbohydrates 5g; fat 29.7g; cholesterol 149.4mg; sodium 486.9mg. Full Nutrition
Advertisement

Reviews (13)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
01/04/2018
I have been making this recipe, from an Italian restaurant in St. Lois, but it is made with chicken breasts. Everything else is exactly the same. I can't wait to make it with pork tenderloin! It's one of my guests favorite dishes. I garnish it with quickly sauteed, fresh, sage leaves! Read More
(6)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 3 stars
01/01/2018
Not for my family I repeated this recipe step-by-step but it was not a flavor we enjoyed. It may have been better with veal. It was time consuming and labour intensive. Unfortunately the end result was not worth the effort. I usually like Chef John's recipes but will not be making this one again. Read More
(3)
17 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 12
  • 4 star values: 1
  • 3 star values: 3
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 1 star values: 1
Rating: 5 stars
01/03/2018
I have been making this recipe, from an Italian restaurant in St. Lois, but it is made with chicken breasts. Everything else is exactly the same. I can't wait to make it with pork tenderloin! It's one of my guests favorite dishes. I garnish it with quickly sauteed, fresh, sage leaves! Read More
(6)
Rating: 3 stars
01/01/2018
Not for my family I repeated this recipe step-by-step but it was not a flavor we enjoyed. It may have been better with veal. It was time consuming and labour intensive. Unfortunately the end result was not worth the effort. I usually like Chef John's recipes but will not be making this one again. Read More
(3)
Rating: 5 stars
11/08/2019
The taste was close to a really good breakfast sausage. The texture is of the tenderest pork chop steak. And with the sauce adding to the juiciness I thought it was just wonderful. For me this turned out to be the best of Chef John's recipes that I've tried cooking yet. Read More
(1)
Advertisement
Rating: 3 stars
12/11/2019
Found to be good and savory. A little burnt with the sauce bit chalk that up to first attempt at this. Will try it again but with company Found the portions to be rather large. Goes good with white wine but then again what doesn't. Read More
(1)
Rating: 5 stars
10/30/2019
Easy and quite authentic tasting. Amazing that pork is definitely a better substitute for veal than chicken and the chopped bits of trimmings do add greatly to the reduction at the end. Don t skip the wine either. Read More
(1)
Rating: 5 stars
03/27/2020
It’s Covide-19 life and so I couldn’t find pork tenderloin but got boneless chops and beat the heck out of them! Still fabulous! I’m not sure why but I struggled with getting the sauce to the thickness I wanted but do freakin’ delicious. Hubs is a picky eater and was sold! Read More
(1)
Advertisement
Rating: 5 stars
11/01/2020
Excellent recipe, easy to make, prepared it just as presented in video. Leftovers were scarce! Read More
Rating: 5 stars
01/06/2021
Sweet lord! This was phenomenal. I didn't use the recipe, I just followed the video, used the same ingredients, and ball-parked the quantities. It was a flavor bonanza. My wife dislikes prosciutto, so she was skeptical. Well, when it comes to this dish, she's just peachy with it. The frying changes the flavor profile so it's not as "gamey." As an extra bonus, I went ahead and used the other half of the tenderloin to make Chef John's "baby" porchetta, so we'll have dinner tomorrow or the next day. I have nothing but respect for Chef John's recipes. They're easy to follow, require common ingredients, and the results are simply spectacular. Please make this. You won't be disappointed. Read More
Rating: 5 stars
05/23/2020
Not hard to make and quite delicious. I’m never crazy about frying in oil but it really doesn’t take much with this dish. I did the extra step of cooking down the scraps but it wasn’t necessary in this case as I already had some pork stock in the freezer. I shouldn’t of put any salt in the stock as the only pork loin I could find had a “touch of salt” and the prosciutto added even more. A great mix of flavors and textures! I think I’ll use 4 sage leaves per piece next time. Read More
Advertisement