Rating: 5 stars
2 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 2
  • 4 star values: 0
  • 3 star values: 0
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 1 star values: 0

The health benefits of fermented foods are well established, and they're tasty to boot! If you're lucky enough to have a bumper crop of beets, try this easy recipe. Once beets are fermented, store in the refrigerator for up to 3 months.

Recipe Summary

prep:
30 mins
additional:
1 week 2 days
total:
1 week 2 days
Servings:
8
Yield:
2 jars
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Ingredients

8
Original recipe yields 8 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist
Brine:

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Distribute beet chunks between two jars with lids. Add 2 cloves garlic, 3 peppercorns, and 1 bay leaf to each jar.

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  • Combine water and salt in a bowl to make the brine; stir until salt is completely dissolved. Pour enough brine into the jars to completely cover the beets.

  • Screw on lids and let jars sit at room temperature until foam starts to appear on top, about 1 week. Transfer jars to a cool place (50 degrees F, 10 degrees C) for 2 to 3 days after foam appears. Store in the refrigerator.

Cook's Notes:

You can also put beets into 1 large jar. In that case only use 2 cloves of garlic, 3 peppercorns, and 1 bay leaf total.

The number of days for fermenting will depend on ambient temperature.

Nutrition Facts

53 calories; protein 2g; carbohydrates 11.9g; fat 0.2g; sodium 963.8mg. Full Nutrition
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Reviews (1)

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
06/12/2018
Easy recipe, beets came out good. Read More
(3)
2 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 2
  • 4 star values: 0
  • 3 star values: 0
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 1 star values: 0
Rating: 5 stars
06/11/2018
Easy recipe, beets came out good. Read More
(3)
Rating: 5 stars
11/04/2020
I like these a lot and they ARE easy! The only trick is using the right kind of beets. Detroit reds hold their color well but I think chioggia beets should only be eaten young and raw or they fade to gray and become less visually appealing. If you’ve let your chioggias get big and old and lose their color, you can still ferment them. They’ll taste fine but not be beautiful jewels on your plate. Read More
(1)