Besides being kind of fun to make, this pourable pizza method doesn't require kneading or rolling/stretching/spinning. So it's an easy way to achieve a really thin-crust pizza. Plus you get that crispy, near-charred bottom you usually get only from a pizza oven.

Recipe Summary

prep:
10 mins
additional:
1 hr 30 mins
total:
1 hr 40 mins
Servings:
4
Yield:
4 (8-inch) pizzas
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Ingredients

4
Original recipe yields 4 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Place flour in mixing bowl with dry yeast, salt, honey, olive oil, and warm water. Whisk together for about 5 minutes. This will be a very thin batter-like dough. Cover and let rise 1 1/2 hours. Dough should be bubbly. Stir with a ladle to eliminate the bubbles.

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  • Generously oil a cast-iron skillet with olive oil off heat. Pour batter in a squeeze bottle or zip-top bag with a bottom corner snipped. Slowly pour the batter into the skillet starting from the center of the pan and working in circles toward the edge. Try to avoid mixing batter with the oil. If small bubbles of oil appear on the surface, use the tip of a paring knife to gently stir them into the dough.

  • Place pan over medium-high heat. Wait for the dough to form bubbles over the entire top surface and the crust starts to dry out a bit. Flip over and continue cooking one side and the next. The bubbly side should be dry and achieve a golden brown color; the bottom should be well browned, about 4 to 5 minutes total per side. Doneness times will depend on how thickly the batter was poured. Remove from heat.

  • Spread with pizza sauce and top with your favorite pizza toppings: mozzarella cheese, grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, pepperoni, etc. Try to avoid topping too heavily.

  • Set oven rack about 6 inches from the heat source and preheat the oven's broiler.

  • Place pizza under broiler until toppings are cooked, 3 to 4 minutes.

Cook's Note:

I used something called double-zero flour or "00" flour, which is an Italian flour used for pasta and pizza making. It is very finely milled, and lovely to work with. If you can't get or find it, just use all-purpose. I weigh my flour and used 14 ounces for this recipe, or approximately 3 cups.

If using a stand mixer to make the dough, use a whisk attachment, not a dough hook!

You can also finish the pizza in a preheated 500 degree F oven (260 degrees C). Toppings should be cooked through after about 4 or 5 minutes.

Nutrition Facts

388 calories; protein 10.5g; carbohydrates 75.2g; fat 4.4g; sodium 527.7mg. Full Nutrition
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Reviews (13)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
10/24/2016
I love this method of making thin crust pizza dough! It's amazingly easy! I recommend weighing the flour based on Chef John's notes to obtain the correct consistency. Should you choose not to weigh the flour start with 1 cup of flour add the honey olive oil salt yeast and water; mix and then gradually add the remaining flour in small increments (approximately 1/4 cup each addition) until the desired consistency is achieved. Ensure that each additional flour is completely incorporated before adding more. The dough should have the consistency of a runny batter (watch the video for guidance). I changed the recipe and method a bit solely out of necessity. I substituted instant yeast for the active dry yeast since I only have instant yeast at home. As a result of this change I was able to cut the rest time by about one hour. I have to admit to cutting corners at the end; instead of piping the dough onto the cast iron skillet I poured approximately 1 cup to 1 1/2 cups of dough into the center of the skillet and spread it around with a large offset spatula using the circumference of my skillet as a guide in making perfectly round pizzas. This method worked for me; however Chef John may not approve of it!;-) I was able to make three 12-inch pizzas with this recipe which my family absolutely loved! I will definitely make this again! Read More
(5)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 3 stars
08/02/2016
It was tricky to decide how many stars to give this because, although it was really good, there is a glaring error in the recipe. 3 cups of flour is way too much. This recipe is supposed to make one smallish pizza, and the batter is supposed to be thin, and the 3 cups of flour was not compatible with that. I wound up adding more water to my batter, but it was still too thick, so when I piped it into the pan it didn't make a thin, crispy crust like it was supposed to. I also made two more pizzas and still had some batter left over! I did get better at making the pizzas as I was working on it, so I bet I'll be really good at it next time when I use the correct amount of flour. Chef John, if you fix the recipe, I'll adjust my review to 5 stars. Read More
(6)
18 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 8
  • 4 star values: 4
  • 3 star values: 4
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 1 star values: 2
Rating: 3 stars
08/01/2016
It was tricky to decide how many stars to give this because, although it was really good, there is a glaring error in the recipe. 3 cups of flour is way too much. This recipe is supposed to make one smallish pizza, and the batter is supposed to be thin, and the 3 cups of flour was not compatible with that. I wound up adding more water to my batter, but it was still too thick, so when I piped it into the pan it didn't make a thin, crispy crust like it was supposed to. I also made two more pizzas and still had some batter left over! I did get better at making the pizzas as I was working on it, so I bet I'll be really good at it next time when I use the correct amount of flour. Chef John, if you fix the recipe, I'll adjust my review to 5 stars. Read More
(6)
Rating: 5 stars
10/24/2016
I love this method of making thin crust pizza dough! It's amazingly easy! I recommend weighing the flour based on Chef John's notes to obtain the correct consistency. Should you choose not to weigh the flour start with 1 cup of flour add the honey olive oil salt yeast and water; mix and then gradually add the remaining flour in small increments (approximately 1/4 cup each addition) until the desired consistency is achieved. Ensure that each additional flour is completely incorporated before adding more. The dough should have the consistency of a runny batter (watch the video for guidance). I changed the recipe and method a bit solely out of necessity. I substituted instant yeast for the active dry yeast since I only have instant yeast at home. As a result of this change I was able to cut the rest time by about one hour. I have to admit to cutting corners at the end; instead of piping the dough onto the cast iron skillet I poured approximately 1 cup to 1 1/2 cups of dough into the center of the skillet and spread it around with a large offset spatula using the circumference of my skillet as a guide in making perfectly round pizzas. This method worked for me; however Chef John may not approve of it!;-) I was able to make three 12-inch pizzas with this recipe which my family absolutely loved! I will definitely make this again! Read More
(5)
Rating: 5 stars
08/25/2016
this is really crisp and delicious! I did have an issue with my bigger skillet, the dough was stuck to the bottom and it wouldn't flip. when I changed to my medium skillet it was much better. I was craving a pizzeria thin and crispy and this definitely met my craving! I did cut the flour to 2 cups as suggested by others and it was perfect pouring consistency. Read More
(3)
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Rating: 5 stars
07/26/2016
My mixer wouldn't do the job so I tried whisking by hand. When that put too much strain on the whisk I used a spatula and no matter how long I mixed it I never got it to liquify. Close but not like yours. It did rise (out of a large pyrex bowl) and that consistency was like yours but after stirring with a ladle again not as thin as your batter. I still made it but for some reason I had enough batter for 2 full size cast iron pan pizzas that were about 1/2" thick. I gave you 5 stars because I see someone else tried it and had a 5 star experience and I'm sure it was. Also I really liked your presentation and witty comments. I'm still a big fan! Read More
(3)
Rating: 3 stars
01/08/2017
I used ap flour. Using a plasitic bag and piping the batter onto the pan did not work for me. I used a ladel and then a spatula to spread it out almost like a crepe. Also the batter absorbed the olive oil that was in the pan so I ended up spraying the pan with oil instead and it worked out much better. Read More
(1)
Rating: 1 stars
04/11/2017
This did not work for me. It wouldn't stay together. Soggy. Read More
(1)
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Rating: 4 stars
10/04/2016
I used the ingredients exactly as described no modifications. It was a cool day where I live so I put it into a 150 degree oven to rise. That worked out fine. However I was confused about the cooking instructions. I thought the batter was for one pizza crust so my crust was very thick (like deep deep DEEP dish) so had to be cooked much longer in the pan before I considered it done. The end result was delicious though - a true carb lover's delight. I will try this again and make 3-4 crusts with it. Read More
Rating: 4 stars
03/06/2020
this is so tasty and fun! I had to modify the cooking a bit since I wanted 6 small pizzas instead of one large, but by turning up the heat and adding a little extra water, these came out great. all 5 children asked that we have it again soon! Read More
Rating: 3 stars
08/26/2019
I weighed out the flour, the dough was way too viscous. I ended up adding probably 3/4 c water to make it pourable. After that, the result was tasty but I think the technique requires practice. Every one I made was iteratively better Read More
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