This recipe was given to me by my sister, who got it from a lady visiting from Hungary in 1961.

Recipe Summary

prep:
20 mins
cook:
3 hrs 30 mins
total:
3 hrs 50 mins
Servings:
6
Yield:
6 servings
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Ingredients

6
Original recipe yields 6 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Melt butter in a large soup pot over medium high heat. Saute onions until soft, then add beef and brown. Stir in caraway seed, marjoram, garlic and paprika. Pour water over all, lower heat to low and simmer for 2 1/2 hours.

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  • Add potatoes and cook until tender, another 45 minutes to 1 hour. Season with salt and pepper to taste and serve.

Nutrition Facts

339 calories; protein 21.8g; carbohydrates 29.1g; fat 15.7g; cholesterol 57.8mg; sodium 84.5mg. Full Nutrition
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Reviews (45)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
10/13/2008
This is just like my Hungarian-born Oma would make...except that she used Chicken. I pretty much followed this recipe, using chicken leg quarters. One thing, however...when she explained it to me, she said that after the onions are soft, take the pan off the heat and let it cool before adding the paprika. If you put the paprika right into the hot butter/onions, it will turn bitter. Read More
(197)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 3 stars
03/06/2008
Unfortunately americans mix up Gulash (Gulyas) with Parikas. This recipe is closer to the later. Authentic Gulyas is made as a soup, with meat, carrots, onions, parsley and small dough dupmplings called "csipetke". Of course paprika is one of the most important ingredients. Some variations are present throughout the country. Paprikas is made with onions, tomatoe, peppers, garlic, paprika and meat. You can cook potaoesin with the meat, or cook dumplings or pasta to go with it. Some people do use sour cream to make it more creamy, and if cooking with hot paprika,it also cuts the heat. Just thought you neened to know. Read More
(277)
59 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 27
  • 4 star values: 16
  • 3 star values: 11
  • 2 star values: 4
  • 1 star values: 1
Rating: 3 stars
03/06/2008
Unfortunately americans mix up Gulash (Gulyas) with Parikas. This recipe is closer to the later. Authentic Gulyas is made as a soup, with meat, carrots, onions, parsley and small dough dupmplings called "csipetke". Of course paprika is one of the most important ingredients. Some variations are present throughout the country. Paprikas is made with onions, tomatoe, peppers, garlic, paprika and meat. You can cook potaoesin with the meat, or cook dumplings or pasta to go with it. Some people do use sour cream to make it more creamy, and if cooking with hot paprika,it also cuts the heat. Just thought you neened to know. Read More
(277)
Rating: 5 stars
10/13/2008
This is just like my Hungarian-born Oma would make...except that she used Chicken. I pretty much followed this recipe, using chicken leg quarters. One thing, however...when she explained it to me, she said that after the onions are soft, take the pan off the heat and let it cool before adding the paprika. If you put the paprika right into the hot butter/onions, it will turn bitter. Read More
(197)
Rating: 5 stars
05/10/2005
This is an awesome easy recipe..a life saver! My husband is Czech and he loved it! The only thing is that you can substitute the flank steak with chuck steak or any other cheaper meat. It cooks so long that it is nice and tender so it doesn't matter. Read More
(110)
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Rating: 3 stars
11/02/2007
not bad recipe though a little short in information and sorry but I have to say it's far away from authentic:) here in hungary we call this kind of meal "pörkölt" which means "made by stewing" and goulash or "gulyás" is a rich soup or stew with potatoes different vegetables paprika and beef. check it out;) Read More
(86)
Rating: 5 stars
04/19/2003
This recipe is exactly what I was looking for. It tastes just like the way my grandmother used to make it. I recommend slow cooking it in a crock pot all day. Read More
(50)
Rating: 3 stars
02/07/2003
It was OK but nothing extraordinary. And it takes forever to cook. Read More
(25)
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Rating: 5 stars
06/12/2006
I gave this recipe (or rather my version of it) 5 stars - my husband and I loved it and will definitely be making this again soon. We are not eating red meat at this time so I subbed ground turkey for the beef I also subbed parsnips for the potatoes which I think gave it a rich sweetness it wouldn't have otherwise had and left out the caraway. I also used chicken stock and more than the recipe called for to make more of a stew. Try it you'll like it! Read More
(24)
Rating: 1 stars
01/17/2005
I couldn't eat this. But my husband had three servings. I will leave it up to him to write his own 5 star review. I thought it had too much paprika and needed something more to make that balance. Since he liked it I would try it again with a better quality and less amount of paprika. I would also make it with a less expensive sut of meat. Stewing for close to three hours would justify a chuck or other stew meat. I wish I had used the flank for another dish. Read More
(21)
Rating: 4 stars
01/18/2005
First I have to say I didn't have any caraway seeds or marjoram. I thought I did when I started this recipe but found I didn't. Instead I added a hearty helping of Mrs. Dash. I cut the meat into bite size pieces and it cooked faster that way. I had to watch because I did need to add more water as it cooked. I have a family of 8. Some liked it just the way it was some added a dallop of sour cream to theirs and one my youngest added sour cream and salsa and declared it a keeper! Strange child! Read More
(17)
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