Recipe for a popular Japanese rice bowl, also known as Katsudon. Garnish with sliced green onions.

otaku

Recipe Summary

prep:
25 mins
cook:
7 mins
total:
32 mins
Servings:
2
Yield:
2 rice bowls
Advertisement

Ingredients

2
Original recipe yields 2 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Mix dashi, sugar, mirin, soy sauce, and salt together in a small bowl.

    Advertisement
  • Heat vegetable oil in a small skillet over medium heat. Add onion; cook and stir until translucent, about 5 minutes. Stir in dashi mixture. Lay pork slices carefully on top of the onions. Drizzle eggs around the slices. Cover skillet and cook until eggs are set, about 2 minutes.

  • Divide rice between 2 bowls. Top each with half the onions, eggs, and pork slices.

Cook's Note:

Substitute chicken stock for the dashi if desired.

Nutrition Facts

590 calories; protein 32g; carbohydrates 58.1g; fat 24g; cholesterol 266.8mg; sodium 1223.9mg. Full Nutrition
Advertisement

Reviews (4)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
02/22/2017
This was a dish I dearly loved to eat when I was stationed in Japan. My small town of Misawa in Aomori-ken had either a breaded pork cutlet or a breaded chicken breast sliced thin so that there was no need to try to cut the meat smaller in order to fit it in the mouth. With pork it was called "katsudon" which was a shortened version of "tonkatsu" (the katsu part was from English "cutlet") and "donburi" or "meal in a bowl." If you used chicken the name changed to oyaku donburi where the oyaku means "mother & child" due to having both chicken and egg. I will sometimes make this dish without meat just the egg and veggies (I add mushrooms) and have it for breakfast. Give this dish a try! Read More
(6)
7 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 7
  • 4 star values: 0
  • 3 star values: 0
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 1 star values: 0
Rating: 5 stars
02/22/2017
This was a dish I dearly loved to eat when I was stationed in Japan. My small town of Misawa in Aomori-ken had either a breaded pork cutlet or a breaded chicken breast sliced thin so that there was no need to try to cut the meat smaller in order to fit it in the mouth. With pork it was called "katsudon" which was a shortened version of "tonkatsu" (the katsu part was from English "cutlet") and "donburi" or "meal in a bowl." If you used chicken the name changed to oyaku donburi where the oyaku means "mother & child" due to having both chicken and egg. I will sometimes make this dish without meat just the egg and veggies (I add mushrooms) and have it for breakfast. Give this dish a try! Read More
(6)
Rating: 5 stars
08/15/2017
I made this with leftover chicken curlet! I sprinkled green onions right before turning off the fire. This is a childhood favorite of mine too! Yummy! Read More
(1)
Rating: 5 stars
01/03/2021
I cooked this for one of my closest friends before studying for our Japanese final since according to our Sensei students in Japan will eat this for good luck before an exam. She loved it so much I taught her how to make it and we later made it for her family. Not only is this recipe absolutely delicious and fun to make but it holds precious memories for me now! I do recommend following a recipe for Tonkatsu first to authentically prepare the pork ! And then follow these directions for Tonkatsu Donburi or more commonly called Katsudon! Read More
Advertisement
Rating: 5 stars
02/08/2018
I'll definitely make this again. It was very good although I did prepare some of the ingredients wrong. Next time I'll add some seasoning to the rice for sure. I ended up using chicken stock instead of dashi stock too. I made it for some of my family and the overall reviews were positive- also if you're making this meal for four only use about two cups of rice and double everything else! I cooked way too much rice using three cups (I think after I cooked it there was about 11 cups worth of rice.) Overall delicious! Read More
Advertisement