Rating: 3.6 stars
5 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 1
  • 4 star values: 1
  • 3 star values: 3
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 1 star values: 0

Tantanmen (dan dan noodles) is a Chinese noodle dish, and very popular in Japan. This contains some Chinese spices that are not very common but many Chinese supermarkets have them in the spices aisle.

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Recipe Summary test

prep:
10 mins
cook:
15 mins
total:
25 mins
Servings:
2
Yield:
2 bowls
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Ingredients

2
Original recipe yields 2 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Heat sesame oil in a skillet over medium heat; add doubanjiang. Cook and stir shallots, garlic, and ginger until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add ground pork; cook and stir until browned, about 3 minutes.

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  • Mix soy sauce, tahini, sake, miso paste, and tianmianjiang into pork mixture until evenly combined. Add chicken stock; bring to a boil. Mix rice vinegar and rayu into pork mixture; add spinach. Simmer soup over low heat for 10 minutes.

  • Put noodles in a bowl of hot water to separate; drain. Mix noodles into soup and garnish with green onions and Thai chile peppers.

Nutrition Facts

561 calories; protein 27.9g; carbohydrates 36.4g; fat 33g; cholesterol 65.2mg; sodium 5122.3mg. Full Nutrition
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Reviews (3)

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
02/03/2019
I changed pork for aubergine. Wonderful! Read More

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 3 stars
08/30/2019
You have doubanjiang described as “soybean paste”, but when ever I search for it or look it up all I can find is doubanjiang “spicy chili paste” . Is it the soybean paste if so where do u find it? Or is it the spicy chili paste and the recipe has a typo. Please let me know! Read More
5 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 1
  • 4 star values: 1
  • 3 star values: 3
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 1 star values: 0
Rating: 5 stars
02/02/2019
I changed pork for aubergine. Wonderful! Read More
Rating: 4 stars
05/15/2021
This was bursting with flavor! I did make a couple of changes. I am not familiar enough with sweet bean paste so I couldn't justify buying it for just 1 teaspoon. The market I went to only had dried Thai chile's which wouldn't have worked so I garnished with Sriracha instead. The other change is that I waited to add the spinach when I added the noodles due to personal preference. This soup had a TON of flavor even without the sweet bean paste. I'd cut back on the tahini next time but other than that I wouldn't make any changes. Read More
Rating: 3 stars
08/29/2019
You have doubanjiang described as “soybean paste”, but when ever I search for it or look it up all I can find is doubanjiang “spicy chili paste” . Is it the soybean paste if so where do u find it? Or is it the spicy chili paste and the recipe has a typo. Please let me know! Read More
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