New this month
Get the Allrecipes magazine

Yaki Mandu

Ivy Vanessa Yapelli

"Yaki Mandu is a Korean dumpling that can be steamed or fried. They look a lot like Chinese pot-stickers. Yaki means fried in Japanese and Mandu means dumpling in Korean. They're great for parties or as an appetizer. There's a lot of prep in making these and they take some time, but as quick as you can fry them they'll be gone!"
Added to shopping list. Go to shopping list.


45 m servings 125 cals
Original recipe yields 25 servings (25 dumplings)

On Sale

What's on sale near you.


Sort stores by

These nearby stores have ingredients on sale!
Find the closest stores
(uses your location)

May we suggest



{{model.addEditText}} Print
  • Prep

  • Cook

  • Ready In

  1. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook and stir beef in the hot skillet until browned and crumbly, 5 to 7 minutes; drain and discard grease.
  2. Heat vegetable oil in a separate skillet over medium heat.
  3. Mix green onions, cabbage, carrot, garlic, 1 tablespoon sesame oil, 1 tablespoon sesame seeds, monosodium glutamate, salt, and pepper into ground beef mixture; cook and stir until liquid is evaporated and vegetables are tender, 5 to 10 minutes. Transfer beef mixture to a bowl and mix in 1 egg.
  4. Crack the second egg into a bowl and beat well.
  5. Hold 1 wonton wrapper in the palm of your hand and brush a thin layer of beaten egg on 1 edge. Scoop about 1 teaspoon beef mixture into the center of the wrapper. Fold wrapper in half, corner to corner, to make a triangle and pinch the edges shut, crimping with your fingers to make a seal. Press the air out by cupping your fingers over the dumpling in your palm and pressing lightly.
  6. Fry wontons in the hot oil until 1 side is browned, 2 to 3 minutes. Flip and cook until other side is browned, 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer wontons to a paper towel-lined plate to drain using a slotted spoon.
  7. Whisk soy sauce, rice wine vinegar, 1 teaspoon sesame oil, and 1 teaspoon sesame seeds together in a bowl until dipping sauce is smooth. Serve alongside wontons.


  • Cook's Notes:
  • Since the veggies release a lot of water in cooking, and if you are using meat with a higher fat content, I recommend you allow the mixture to reduce so that there is not a lot of liquid remaining. Too much liquid can cause the wrappers to break.

Nutrition Facts

Per Serving: 125 calories; 5.8 g fat; 12.1 g carbohydrates; 5.7 g protein; 28 mg cholesterol; 246 mg sodium. Powered by the ESHA Research Database © 2018, ESHA Research, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Similar: RecipesVideosCategoriesArticles

Similar: {{title}} recipes videos categories articles


Read all reviews 2
Most helpful
Most positive
Least positive

I love Mandu. This is a great recipe using ground beef or pork. Just like my mother in law made. She's Korean. I do suggest making the dipping sauce to go along with it. Soy sauce, rice wine vin...

I added more spice they were slightly bland.