A bread like polenta, but without the corn! This is gluten-free bread with herb flavors based on my take of Liguria, Italy recipes.

sueb
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Ingredients

8
Original recipe yields 8 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Whisk chickpea flour and water together in a bowl until smooth; let sit at room temperature, 2 to 6 hours.

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  • Preheat oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C). Spray the inside of an 8-inch metal pie pan.

  • Skim foam from the top of chickpea-water mixture. Add oil, Italian seasoning, and rosemary and stir until combined. Pour mixture into the prepared pan; sprinkle black pepper and salt over the top.

  • Bake in the preheated oven until edges begin to brown, about 15 minutes. Remove bread from pan and cut into wedges.

Cook's Notes:

Use a metal pie pan; a glass or ceramic one may break with the extremely high temperature!

Chickpea flour is also known as garbanzo bean flour.

Nutrition Facts

75 calories; 4.3 g total fat; 0 mg cholesterol; 20 mg sodium. 7.2 g carbohydrates; 2.4 g protein; Full Nutrition

Reviews (27)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
11/08/2016
Update 8 Nov 2016. For those of you having trouble with the farinata sticking to your pan: put the oiled pan inside the oven while it preheats. This is a trick that breadmakers in Italy use to keep the mixture from sticking! :-) My original teview: This is just like I had in Portofino from the street side bakeries. "La farinata" as it is called in Italy is a fast and easy alternative to cornbread and wheat bread. This recipe is perfect leaving you with a flavourful, sponge-like focaccia to enjoy with salads, soup or on its own. The method is right on. I let it sit for 4 hours uncovered but was told by the submitter of this recipe it is best covered. Mine tasted just fine nonetheless. It cooks up quickly and takes only minutes to put together. It is also nice the next day reheated on the grill similar to polenta, crisping it to be used for appetisers and even as a base for gluten free pizza! Thank you sueb for sharing this recipe. Read More
(44)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 3 stars
05/04/2016
This was nicely spiced to accent the mild, slightly nutty, flavour of the hydrated bean flour and olive oil. However, it stuck all over the pan (even though I greased the pan) and seemed under done to me despite cooking it the allotted amount of time and waiting for it to brown on the edges. I plan on trying this again, but I will take the advice of other recipes for the same thing and use a cast iron skillet, heat the pan up until the oil just starts to smoke, pour the batter into the centre of the pan, and then bake in the oven until it browns at a bit more than just at the very edges. Heating the pan before adding the batter is supposed to prevent sticking. Read More
(11)
32 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 18
  • 4 star values: 7
  • 3 star values: 3
  • 2 star values: 1
  • 1 star values: 3
Rating: 5 stars
11/08/2016
Update 8 Nov 2016. For those of you having trouble with the farinata sticking to your pan: put the oiled pan inside the oven while it preheats. This is a trick that breadmakers in Italy use to keep the mixture from sticking! :-) My original teview: This is just like I had in Portofino from the street side bakeries. "La farinata" as it is called in Italy is a fast and easy alternative to cornbread and wheat bread. This recipe is perfect leaving you with a flavourful, sponge-like focaccia to enjoy with salads, soup or on its own. The method is right on. I let it sit for 4 hours uncovered but was told by the submitter of this recipe it is best covered. Mine tasted just fine nonetheless. It cooks up quickly and takes only minutes to put together. It is also nice the next day reheated on the grill similar to polenta, crisping it to be used for appetisers and even as a base for gluten free pizza! Thank you sueb for sharing this recipe. Read More
(44)
Rating: 5 stars
11/08/2016
Update 8 Nov 2016. For those of you having trouble with the farinata sticking to your pan: put the oiled pan inside the oven while it preheats. This is a trick that breadmakers in Italy use to keep the mixture from sticking! :-) My original teview: This is just like I had in Portofino from the street side bakeries. "La farinata" as it is called in Italy is a fast and easy alternative to cornbread and wheat bread. This recipe is perfect leaving you with a flavourful, sponge-like focaccia to enjoy with salads, soup or on its own. The method is right on. I let it sit for 4 hours uncovered but was told by the submitter of this recipe it is best covered. Mine tasted just fine nonetheless. It cooks up quickly and takes only minutes to put together. It is also nice the next day reheated on the grill similar to polenta, crisping it to be used for appetisers and even as a base for gluten free pizza! Thank you sueb for sharing this recipe. Read More
(44)
Rating: 5 stars
12/27/2015
I also used chicken or bone broth instead of water for additional flavor so many ideas can be made with this recipe. This is an excellent recipe thanks for sharing! I've made for a pizza crust too. Read More
(15)
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Rating: 5 stars
03/12/2016
Thanks - this was terrific! I didn't see any need to skim the foam - and I thought the foam might give it some lift so I folded it in. I wonder if the person who found it dry and grainy missed the instruction to mix and let it sit for hours. Anyhow - thanks I can see lots of room for lots of variations here! Read More
(12)
Rating: 3 stars
05/04/2016
This was nicely spiced to accent the mild, slightly nutty, flavour of the hydrated bean flour and olive oil. However, it stuck all over the pan (even though I greased the pan) and seemed under done to me despite cooking it the allotted amount of time and waiting for it to brown on the edges. I plan on trying this again, but I will take the advice of other recipes for the same thing and use a cast iron skillet, heat the pan up until the oil just starts to smoke, pour the batter into the centre of the pan, and then bake in the oven until it browns at a bit more than just at the very edges. Heating the pan before adding the batter is supposed to prevent sticking. Read More
(11)
Rating: 4 stars
05/04/2016
Not bad :) I baked mine longer, because I like it more dry. I think next time I'll add some onions & mushrooms! :) Read More
(7)
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Rating: 5 stars
09/08/2017
Turned out beautiful, I made it a few times, in my modified version that I loved I used half cup rice flour and that makes the batter more digestible and lighter. I even tried it once as a pizza with finely chopped inside salami (gluten free) and olives and basil. It' even better toasted the next day. If you want to prevent sticking you could use baking paper like I did. That's one of my favorite recipes now and regularly present in my gluten free diet. Read More
(6)
Rating: 4 stars
02/13/2017
The recipe was a success. I took Buckwheat Queen's note about heating the pan first and my bread didn't stick. I added some garlic powder to the batter and Parmesan cheese on top which definitely brought more flavor to the finished recipe. I"ll definitely make this again and crisp up the individual pieces in a pan for more texture. Read More
(6)
Rating: 5 stars
01/19/2016
I cooked mine a couple of minutes longer. Read More
(4)
Rating: 4 stars
04/17/2016
i made this and had no problem with sticking because I used a spray giving my pan a thick coating. Sometimes greasing a pan does not work as well as a spray. The flavor is good and I am fond of chickpeas. Other spices could be used to give it a mid eastern flavor such as paprika and corriander. Read More
(4)