Rating: 3.67 stars
3 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 0
  • 4 star values: 2
  • 3 star values: 1
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 1 star values: 0

This is a sweet, very potent beverage that can be found at Lithuanian festivals and Lithuanian social clubs in Baltimore. They usually pronounce it 'VIT-a-tis'. Viryta is usually homemade by descendants of Lithuanian immigrants, using recipes that have been handed down through the generations, and is a popular commodity around the holidays. It took me years to finally get someone to teach me how to make it; most of the people around Baltimore who make it are very secretive about their family recipes! I'd probably catch an earful if she knew I posted it online!

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Recipe Summary test

prep:
15 mins
cook:
1 hr
additional:
1 week 1 day
total:
1 week 1 day
Servings:
36
Yield:
2 750ml bottles
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Ingredients

36
Original recipe yields 36 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Peel orange and lemon in a circular motion in a large strip. Place peels in a warm, dry area to dry for 24 hours.

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  • Stir honey, 1 cup water, sugar, caraway seeds, cloves, vanilla extract, cinnamon, and ground nutmeg together in a large pot; bring to a rolling boil, reduce heat to low, and simmer for 45 minutes. Add dried orange and lemon peels to honey mixture; continue to simmer for 15 minutes.

  • Remove from heat; discard fruit peels. Stir grain alcohol and remaining 2 1/2 cups water into honey mixture. Transfer mixture to a glass container and tightly cover with a lid. Place in a cool location out of direct sunlight and let set, gently swirling container every few days, for 1 week.

  • Strain mixture through double-layered cheesecloth to remove sediment. Pour liqueur into bottles or decanters and seal.

Cook's Note:

Some people confuse Viryta with Krupnik, but they are two different types of honey-flavored spirits. Krupnik is a Polish liqueur with a vodka base; Viryta is of Lithuanian origin and has a grain alcohol base and much higher alcoholic content per ounce.

Liquid must set in a tightly-covered glass container. This is very important, as leaving the mixture uncovered during its 'setting' period will allow much of the alcohol to evaporate.

Nutrition Facts

187 calories; protein 0.2g; carbohydrates 28.1g; fat 0.2g; sodium 3mg. Full Nutrition
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Reviews (1)

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 4 stars
11/04/2014
This is very close to the recipe my family has handed down for generations with the exception of a few ingredients...can't say what they are unless you marry one of my kids. ;-) Enjoy!! Read More
(10)
3 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 0
  • 4 star values: 2
  • 3 star values: 1
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 1 star values: 0
Rating: 4 stars
11/04/2014
This is very close to the recipe my family has handed down for generations with the exception of a few ingredients...can't say what they are unless you marry one of my kids. ;-) Enjoy!! Read More
(10)
Rating: 4 stars
10/23/2021
This is close to the cold version my family makes but like another reviewer, there are some differences that would effect the final product. As for @Vern, our family also made a hot version every Christmas Eve. That was whiskey, lemon, honey and caraway seed based. Polar opposites yet 100% Lithuanian traditions in our homes. One tip for the cold version...skip the grain and use a high alcohol rum like Appletons 151 in 1:1 substitution. The rum gives it a nice depth of flavor that the grain cannot. It still gives quite a kick... Read More
Rating: 3 stars
12/21/2020
Not close at all. My grandmother wes from Lithuania, and my mother handed down the recipi to me 40 years ago. I remember drinking warm shots of this on Christmas eve. I wish so much I could give you the correct recipi. But it. Read More
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