A unique twist on peanut brittle. I mixed the seasonal flavors of maple and pecans and it turned out beautifully. The brittle has a slightly buttery taste to it from the nuts and a warmth from the maple.

Recipe Summary

prep:
10 mins
cook:
15 mins
additional:
30 mins
total:
55 mins
Servings:
36
Yield:
36 servings
Advertisement

Ingredients

36
Original recipe yields 36 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or spray with cooking spray.

    Advertisement
  • Mix sugar, corn syrup, maple syrup, water, and salt together in a pot over medium heat until sugar is dissolved, 5 to 10 minutes. Fold pecans into sugar mixture.

  • Place a candy thermometer in pecan mixture and turn heat up to medium-high. Gently stir mixture until it reaches 300 degrees F (150 degrees C), about 10 minutes.

  • Quickly removing pot from heat and stir in margarine and baking soda until well mixed. Pour mixture onto the prepared baking sheet and spread out with a spatula. Allow to cool until hardened, about 30 minutes. Break into pieces.

Nutrition Facts

143 calories; protein 0.9g 2% DV; carbohydrates 18.8g 6% DV; fat 8g 12% DV; cholesterol 0mg; sodium 152.4mg 6% DV. Full Nutrition
Advertisement

Reviews (11)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
10/16/2015
Tip: keep stirring the pot until it gets to 300. Very important! Next I do not recommend doubling recipe. Just make two separate batches. When I did double it came out like soft taffy. Read More
(3)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 1 stars
12/20/2015
This was an expensive disaster. Not sure where I went wrong. It turned out very lumpy and crystallized. The candy portion reminded me of the maple candies that are made in Vermont. Not what you want for brittle. In hindsight I wish I hadn't thrown it directly in the garbage after it cooled it off. Broken into small pieces and mixed into some softened vanilla ice cream it may have been salvageable even good. I've had lots of success making brittle in the microwave (never failed). I'll continue to use that method in the future. Edit: Ok I've done a little sleuthing on the contributor's page and see she has another recipe for maple pecan brittle that's almost identical with the exception of one critical ingredient the maple syrup. That recipe clearly calls for "original maple syrup the thick gooey stuff." I'm thinking that this would be something like maple flavored Karo syrup not 100% pure maple syrup. I can't help but wonder if using pure maple syrup was the cause of this recipe failing. Proceed with caution if you're thinking about trying this recipe! Read More
(1)
11 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 6
  • 4 star values: 0
  • 3 star values: 3
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 1 star values: 2
Rating: 5 stars
11/30/2014
Sooo good! If you dont have a candy thermometer you can fill a glass with cold water and drizzle a sample of the candy into it. If it hardens immediately its ready to come off the heat:) Read More
(3)
Rating: 5 stars
10/16/2015
Tip: keep stirring the pot until it gets to 300. Very important! Next I do not recommend doubling recipe. Just make two separate batches. When I did double it came out like soft taffy. Read More
(3)
Rating: 5 stars
09/13/2014
Somebody take my pulse! I think I have died & gone to heaven!I love maple candy & I love brittle, & this is the best brittle I have ever had! I wish I would of thought of this myself! I will never make regular brittle again! This Maple Brittle Rules & I can't wait to make it for Christmas this year & forever! Read More
(2)
Advertisement
Rating: 1 stars
12/20/2015
This was an expensive disaster. Not sure where I went wrong. It turned out very lumpy and crystallized. The candy portion reminded me of the maple candies that are made in Vermont. Not what you want for brittle. In hindsight I wish I hadn't thrown it directly in the garbage after it cooled it off. Broken into small pieces and mixed into some softened vanilla ice cream it may have been salvageable even good. I've had lots of success making brittle in the microwave (never failed). I'll continue to use that method in the future. Edit: Ok I've done a little sleuthing on the contributor's page and see she has another recipe for maple pecan brittle that's almost identical with the exception of one critical ingredient the maple syrup. That recipe clearly calls for "original maple syrup the thick gooey stuff." I'm thinking that this would be something like maple flavored Karo syrup not 100% pure maple syrup. I can't help but wonder if using pure maple syrup was the cause of this recipe failing. Proceed with caution if you're thinking about trying this recipe! Read More
(1)
Rating: 5 stars
02/04/2015
This was absolutely delicious! Definitely my new favorite brittle and I don't know why there aren't more rave reviews about it. I halved the recipe and used butter instead of margarine (because that's what I had and because that's what I've used in peanut brittle in the past) and it came out perfectly. I used the ice cold water / hard string that cracks method to test when to add the butter and baking soda. Perhaps I could have used a bit less butter but overall I love this will have to keep myself from eating it all in one sitting. The flavor of the pecans is really brought out by cooking them and there is just a delightful hint of maple. Read More
(1)
Rating: 5 stars
12/24/2013
This is the best brittle I've ever eaten. Read More
Advertisement
Rating: 1 stars
12/26/2018
Followed directions exactly and wound up with maple sugar covered pecans. Waste of time and money Read More
Rating: 3 stars
12/13/2016
I didn't make this recipe but I have a question... If anyone can help... I make an amazing peanut brittle. JS. I've tried several times just subbing pecans for peanuts and it just never comes out the same.. It comes out kinda chewy.. Is there a moisture difference or something between the peanuts and pecans? I don't know why it comes out so different. Read More
Rating: 3 stars
03/18/2015
Had a problem. It tastes OK but it seems almost burned. It began to smell burned at about 250 degrees. Was I heating too rapidly or is there some other possible reason....... Read More
Advertisement