Thai native Nong Poonsukwattana worked her way up from Portland kitchens, refining her recipe for khao man gai, saving her money and eventually landing her own spot within Portland's highly competitive food cart scene.

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Ingredients

6
Original recipe yields 6 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Chicken:
Rice:
Sauce:
Garnish:

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Boil water in a large pot. Place chicken, garlic, ginger, salt, and sugar in the pot. Return to boil and let simmer for 35 minutes. Remove chicken, cover to keep warm, and set aside.

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  • Heat coconut oil in a rice cooker or heavy-bottomed pot with lid; cook and stir garlic, shallots, ginger, and pandan leaves until golden and aromatic.

  • Pour rice into the rice cooker or pot; stir to coat with oil. Stir in chicken broth and set the rice cooker cycle. If using a pot, bring rice to a boil, cover, reduce heat to low, and simmer 15 minutes.

  • Combine ginger, red Thai chilies, fermented soybeans, pickled garlic, white vinegar, and soy sauce in a food processor or blender. Pulse until liquefied, but not smooth in texture.

  • Debone chicken and cut into 1-inch pieces.

  • Place chicken pieces over cooked rice to serve. Top with sauce (or serve sauce on the side) and garnish with cucumbers and cilantro. Enjoy!

Nutrition Facts

589.1 calories; protein 31.2g 62% DV; carbohydrates 70.9g 23% DV; fat 19.2g 30% DV; cholesterol 63mg 21% DV; sodium 2465.1mg 99% DV. Full Nutrition

Reviews (10)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
02/21/2012
I believe there is a mistake in this recipe. Proportion of broth to rice. For two cups of rice there should be FOUR cups of broth. Otherwise too dry and uncooked. Almost every rice recipe requires two parts liquid/broth to one part rice. Otherwise PRIMO. I actually went to the trouble to find all the 'exotic' ingredients. Portland OR has a great Thai-oriented grocery called Lily's Market. If you have an Asian community in your community you should be able to find these ingredients. The panda leaves shown as optional are incredibly aromatic and like nothing else. When you smell them you realize you've been exposed to them in every Thai restaurant you've ever been in. Read More
(26)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 3 stars
03/05/2012
This doesn't taste like the Khao Man Gai you'd buy from the restaurant. And the rice that comes out of this recipe isn't really oily. The name "Khao Man Gai" translates to Rice from Chicken Fat. Also when cooking the rice if you're chopping the garlic look at the video to see how they should be chopped. They're chopped in big slivers vs. chopped pieces. When I cooked the rice we used 3 cups of broth vs. 2 cups of broth and it came out good. Not too wet or dry. The food came out good but I'd stick to buying this instead. Read More
(8)
13 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 10
  • 4 star values: 1
  • 3 star values: 2
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 1 star values: 0
Rating: 5 stars
02/20/2012
I believe there is a mistake in this recipe. Proportion of broth to rice. For two cups of rice there should be FOUR cups of broth. Otherwise too dry and uncooked. Almost every rice recipe requires two parts liquid/broth to one part rice. Otherwise PRIMO. I actually went to the trouble to find all the 'exotic' ingredients. Portland OR has a great Thai-oriented grocery called Lily's Market. If you have an Asian community in your community you should be able to find these ingredients. The panda leaves shown as optional are incredibly aromatic and like nothing else. When you smell them you realize you've been exposed to them in every Thai restaurant you've ever been in. Read More
(26)
Rating: 3 stars
03/05/2012
This doesn't taste like the Khao Man Gai you'd buy from the restaurant. And the rice that comes out of this recipe isn't really oily. The name "Khao Man Gai" translates to Rice from Chicken Fat. Also when cooking the rice if you're chopping the garlic look at the video to see how they should be chopped. They're chopped in big slivers vs. chopped pieces. When I cooked the rice we used 3 cups of broth vs. 2 cups of broth and it came out good. Not too wet or dry. The food came out good but I'd stick to buying this instead. Read More
(8)
Rating: 5 stars
07/24/2013
A variation of this has become a staple of my diet; easy delicious and cheap. I substitute legs or thighs if available and then use the broth from cooking the chicken to cook the rice instead of this other process. I also add fish sauce. The rice ratio here (1 water/broth:1 rice) is for fresh rice--that's my theory as to why Nong's is so good--for OK jasmine rice that isn't particularly fresh use a 1.5:1 or 2:1 ratio. Read More
(4)
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Rating: 5 stars
08/31/2012
Excellent! Amzaing flavor! Read More
(2)
Rating: 5 stars
12/22/2016
I've made this a couple of times and it's delicious. My daughter LOVES it. I serve it with homemade quick pickles made with rice vinegar and fish sauce. I've had to substitute miso for the fermented beans because I haven't been able to find them. Also I've added an extra cup of broth to the rice. I use the broth that the chicken was cooked in. Read More
(1)
Rating: 4 stars
06/24/2019
Chicken: -needed almost a gallon of water -increased the salt by 2 teaspoons -stuffed the chicken with ginger and green onions This made the chicken flavorful inside and out. For the rice I used 1 tablespoon of chicken fat fried from the excess fat and skin trimmings instead of coconut oil. This made the rice bursting with flavor and aroma. Read More
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Rating: 5 stars
05/05/2020
So easy. So good. Read More
Rating: 5 stars
10/14/2014
This is a fabulous recipe that has become a regular in our household. There is in fact an error in rice to water ratio. I use 2 cups rice to 3 cups broth that the chicken cooked in and it comes out perfect every time! I also season the cooking broth with extra salt and serve as an accompaniment to the chicken and rice. My family enjoys the broth as much as the chicken and rice. I freeze the extra and then heat up for snacks or when someone is feeling a bit under the weather. Ginger is great for upset tummies! Enjoy! Read More
Rating: 5 stars
07/14/2020
I did what some of the other reviewers recommended and used approximately a 2:1 chicken broth to rice ratio in the rice cooker and it came out fluffy and delicious. Next time I will try to time the boiling chicken and steaming rice better so that the chicken can be cut and served right away, as the gai dries out quite quickly. Personally I recommend buying some nam jim sauce in the store as a backup, since this sauce is known to be difficult to properly make. Overall it definitely tastes like the authentic khao man gai that I've eaten in BKK Read More