This is a waffle cookie seasoned with anise seed and anise oil. It is baked on a waffle iron. It is not a really sweet cookie, but it was sent to soldiers during WWII because they keep well and the flavor seems to get better with each passing day. Lasts about 2 weeks unrefrigerated. Handed down from my German-Swiss grandmother. You can also use lemon or vanilla flavoring instead of the anise seed and oil; of course, it changes the flavor completely, but if you're looking for a nice 'not too sweet' cookie, this recipe is a good place to start. My children love making these - it's fun, it's easy.

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Recipe Summary

prep:
15 mins
cook:
30 mins
additional:
45 mins
total:
1 hr 30 mins
Servings:
36
Yield:
3 dozen cookies
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Ingredients

36
Original recipe yields 36 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Preheat a waffle iron according to manufacturer's instructions. Whisk together flour, anise seed, and salt in a bowl.

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  • In a separate bowl, mash the shortening until creamy, and stir with all of the sugar, eggs, and anise oil until thoroughly mixed. Stir the flour mixture into the wet ingredients to form a dough. Break off about 1 tablespoon of dough per cookie, and roll into 1-inch balls.

  • Spray the waffle iron with cooking spray. Place dough balls onto the iron, close the lid, and bake until the iron stops emitting steam and the cookies are lightly golden brown, 1 to 3 minutes. Check after about 1 minute. Remove the cookies from the iron and sprinkle with confectioners' sugar while still warm. Cool on wire rack.

Nutrition Facts

89 calories; protein 1.5g 3% DV; carbohydrates 13.3g 4% DV; fat 3.3g 5% DV; cholesterol 11.5mg 4% DV; sodium 36.9mg 2% DV. Full Nutrition
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Reviews (7)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
11/18/2010
I am of English and French descent and I too call these pizelles...and usually would make them on a pizelle iron. My grandmother had the best pizelle iron ever...but she and it are gone now. I have never tried these with anise (always used peppermint or almond oil) though I am sure I would love them. Read More
(12)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 2 stars
12/03/2010
Different kind of recipe for this--definitely not like pizelles which is usually a batter. Had to hold down my pizelle iron the whole time and they just came out thick and would not fill the whole space. Tried larger balls and still did not turn out. Too difficult to use as a dough. Ended up making this dough into a batter by adding cream and eggs. Most pizelle batters use about double the butter and double the eggs as this one. Read More
(8)
7 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 5
  • 4 star values: 1
  • 3 star values: 0
  • 2 star values: 1
  • 1 star values: 0
Rating: 5 stars
11/18/2010
I am of English and French descent and I too call these pizelles...and usually would make them on a pizelle iron. My grandmother had the best pizelle iron ever...but she and it are gone now. I have never tried these with anise (always used peppermint or almond oil) though I am sure I would love them. Read More
(12)
Rating: 5 stars
11/09/2010
Haven't tried this yet but have same recipe basically and I being Italian call them Pizzelles! They are delicious and not too sweet! Read More
(9)
Rating: 2 stars
12/02/2010
Different kind of recipe for this--definitely not like pizelles which is usually a batter. Had to hold down my pizelle iron the whole time and they just came out thick and would not fill the whole space. Tried larger balls and still did not turn out. Too difficult to use as a dough. Ended up making this dough into a batter by adding cream and eggs. Most pizelle batters use about double the butter and double the eggs as this one. Read More
(8)
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Rating: 4 stars
08/16/2012
These are not pizzelles. I imagine if they were the title of the recipe would be Anise Pizzelles and the directions would tell you to use a pizzelle iron. Dont give this cookie a bad review because you assume its something its not. These are good and easy to make in a WAFFLE IRON per the instructions. I will try these again with the other suggested flavors as well. They were quick and would be great for the holidays. Read More
(4)
Rating: 5 stars
02/01/2014
These were great! Made with my daughter for a school project. So fun and easy. Can see making these over and over again in different flavors. We made as directed in one batch also made a second batch vanilla flavored. Had powered vanilla so used 1/2 tsp powered and a couple of drops of liquid in place of the anise. Think it like the original version best but both were great. This is a keeper!!!! A lot like a shortbread cookie only made in a waffle iron. So different and very pretty! Read More
Rating: 5 stars
06/11/2018
Easy to follow instructions. I like not having to use the oven and that it bakes so quickly. I like that this recipe yields cookies that aren t too sweet too. This recipe is a keeper. Read More
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Rating: 5 stars
06/01/2016
I made these this afternoon for tea time. I searched out a recipe using anise and a waffle iron (due to heat). I bake and collect cookie recipes of all kinds (for 30 years) This one will become my new favorite placed on the top of my list as all time best! Texture was wonderful flavor (added extra anise oil) excellent! Thank you for sharing such a quality recipe. They work! Read More
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