Serve right away or at room temperature or even chilled. Great served with teriyaki chicken or Korean short ribs. Delicious!

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Ingredients

2
Original recipe yields 2 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Fill a large pot with lightly salted water and bring to a rolling boil over high heat. Once the water is boiling, stir in the dang myun noodles, and return to a boil. Cook the noodles uncovered, stirring occasionally, until the noodles have cooked through, but are still firm to the bite, 4 to 5 minutes. Rinse with cold water and drain well in a colander set in the sink. Toss noodles with 1 teaspoon of sesame oil. Set aside. Whisk soy sauce and sugar in a small bowl. Set aside.

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  • Heat the vegetable oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Stir in the garlic, onion, carrots, and asparagus; cook and stir until the vegetables have softened, about 5 minutes. Stir in green onions and shiitake mushrooms and continue cooking and stirring for 30 seconds. Pour in the soy sauce mixture, then add the noodles. Cook and stir until the noodles are warmed through, 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from heat and toss with sesame seeds and the remaining 1 1/2 teaspoon of sesame oil.

Partner Tip

Reynolds® Aluminum foil can be used to keep food moist, cook it evenly, and make clean-up easier.

Nutrition Facts

673.2 calories; 17.3 g protein; 117.2 g carbohydrates; 0 mg cholesterol; 1639.1 mg sodium. Full Nutrition

Reviews (20)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
02/28/2011
Mmmm... I love the flavor - salty sweet and pungent. I used Korean sweet potato starch noodles - I don't know that is the same as the recipe. I used a whole onion & I was too lazy to cut match-stick carrots so I shredded them instead (that might have made them a little wet but it was still good). I used spinach instead of asparagus & fresh mushrooms instead of dried shiitake. Great recipe! Thanks for sharing! Read More
(25)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 2 stars
01/31/2011
Few missing ingredients in this, Beef for example is important, Beaten eggs thats sliced thinly is another missing ingredient. Asparagus is not included in the traditional receipe either. Koreans eat this dish when there is something to celebrate or they are entertaining guests. Read More
(34)
26 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 17
  • 4 star values: 7
  • 3 star values: 1
  • 2 star values: 1
  • 1 star values: 0
Rating: 2 stars
01/31/2011
Few missing ingredients in this, Beef for example is important, Beaten eggs thats sliced thinly is another missing ingredient. Asparagus is not included in the traditional receipe either. Koreans eat this dish when there is something to celebrate or they are entertaining guests. Read More
(34)
Rating: 5 stars
02/28/2011
Mmmm... I love the flavor - salty sweet and pungent. I used Korean sweet potato starch noodles - I don't know that is the same as the recipe. I used a whole onion & I was too lazy to cut match-stick carrots so I shredded them instead (that might have made them a little wet but it was still good). I used spinach instead of asparagus & fresh mushrooms instead of dried shiitake. Great recipe! Thanks for sharing! Read More
(25)
Rating: 4 stars
06/17/2010
Forgot to soak the mushrooms so I left them out. Also swapped blanched spinach for the asparagus and tossed in a few leftover sprouts. Read More
(14)
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Rating: 5 stars
04/01/2010
I thought it was pretty great although it could have used more flavor. i can't blame the recipe since i made some substitutions. i added crumbled tofu and i used oyster mushrooms instead of shiitake. i didn't have asparagus so i omitted that. Read More
(7)
Rating: 4 stars
03/16/2012
Kind of strange to have asparagus with japchae so I replaced it with spinach. This is sort of bland as is so next time I'll possibly do 1.5x the soy sauce sugar mixture and double the sesame oil. I also put in a bit of rice vinegar into the sauce mixture to give it a bit of tang. Be careful not to add too much oil while stir frying (although the noodles stick to the pan easily...) or it'll become a bit too oily. Yummy and much cheaper than buying it at a Korean supermarket! Read More
(6)
Rating: 5 stars
02/23/2012
Being Korean my mom use to make this all the time for us....family and friends. Sometimes she would add beef or chicken...but it's great with or without. I made it the way you have it written and it came out delicious! Read More
(6)
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Rating: 5 stars
01/21/2011
I thought it was good. Milder than I thought it would be but still tasty. Read More
(6)
Rating: 4 stars
11/18/2012
Made this as a side dish to some broccoli stuffed chicken. Substituted green beans for the asparagus. Did not add the rest of the sesame oil because the 1 teaspoon seemed to be enough. Also used the rice cellophane noodles. Read More
(4)
Rating: 5 stars
09/17/2014
This recipe turned out very much like what I eat at the Korean restaurant we frequent. My husband who is Korean liked it very much as well. I did use spinach instead of asparagus just my preference. I also added tofu just because that's how I usually get it at the restaurant. My husband would normally eat this with some beef or pork in it but he liked this and is happy to eat a vegetarian version of it as I'm vegetarian. I found myself adding extra sesame oil and soy sauce but I may have used more noodles than the recipe really called for. Thanks for the lovely recipe! Read More
(2)