This venison version of chicken fried steak comes out crispy, and the flavor is as good as its beef counterpart. The caramelized onions and gravy make it a solid meal for the whole family.

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Ingredients

4
Original recipe yields 4 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Beat the egg in a bowl, then whisk in 1 cup of milk and the hot pepper sauce. Pound the venison steaks with a meat mallet to 1/4 inch thick, and place into the milk mixture. Stir together the cornmeal, bread crumbs, cornstarch, baking soda, black pepper, and garlic salt in a shallow dish.

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  • Remove the venison steaks from the milk mixture one at a time, allowing the excess to run off, and press into the bread crumb mixture; set aside. Reserve the remaining bread crumb mixture.

  • Heat the oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Place as many breaded venison steaks into the pan as will fit without overlapping. Cook until the venison is golden brown on both sides, about 3 minutes per side. Remove to drain on a paper towel lined plate and keep warm. Repeat with remaining venison.

  • Once the venison has finished cooking, stir the onions into the hot oil, and cook until dark brown, about 5 minutes. Pour off and discard the oil, remove the onions to a plate and set aside. Stir the reserved bread crumb mixture into the hot skillet, and cook for a few seconds until it begins to toast. Stir in the remaining cup of milk, and simmer until the milk has thickened, about 5 minutes. Pour the gravy over the venison steaks and top with the caramelized onions to serve.

Cook's Note

The caramelized onions may also be stirred into the gravy as it simmers.

Editor's Note

The nutrition data for this recipe includes the full amount of the breading ingredients. The actual amount of the breading consumed will vary. We have determined the nutritional value of oil for frying based on a retention value of 10% after cooking. The exact amount will vary depending on cooking time and temperature, ingredient density, and the specific type of oil used.

Nutrition Facts

522.2 calories; 55.5 g protein; 33.3 g carbohydrates; 230.3 mg cholesterol; 1372.4 mg sodium. Full Nutrition

Reviews (23)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
10/28/2008
I loved this recipe! the coating was crispy the meat succulent and tender and the gravy was divine. I am not a fan of chicken fried recipes but this almost reminded me of a schnitzel and was heavenly in every mouthful! Read More
(25)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 2 stars
10/24/2008
This was really good. However my whole family hunts so we have a lot of wild meat. (which is the healthiest for you) The way we prepare our venison and elk steaks is the way we would do a beef steak We spead it with olive oil using a pastry brush shake on our seasonings let set about ten minutes place them on the preheated grill seasoned side down brush top side with olive oil and shake on seasonings. Only grill each side for 5 - 8 minutes You never want to overcook wild game. It comes out delicious this way and very moist (unless you overcook it) Wild game has not got a lot of fat it is very lean and very healthy because of that. Some people feel that because it is wild it needs to be cooked a long time not true! Rare to med rare is the best for wild game. Read More
(40)
25 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 13
  • 4 star values: 5
  • 3 star values: 5
  • 2 star values: 1
  • 1 star values: 1
Rating: 2 stars
10/24/2008
This was really good. However my whole family hunts so we have a lot of wild meat. (which is the healthiest for you) The way we prepare our venison and elk steaks is the way we would do a beef steak We spead it with olive oil using a pastry brush shake on our seasonings let set about ten minutes place them on the preheated grill seasoned side down brush top side with olive oil and shake on seasonings. Only grill each side for 5 - 8 minutes You never want to overcook wild game. It comes out delicious this way and very moist (unless you overcook it) Wild game has not got a lot of fat it is very lean and very healthy because of that. Some people feel that because it is wild it needs to be cooked a long time not true! Rare to med rare is the best for wild game. Read More
(40)
Rating: 5 stars
10/28/2008
I loved this recipe! the coating was crispy the meat succulent and tender and the gravy was divine. I am not a fan of chicken fried recipes but this almost reminded me of a schnitzel and was heavenly in every mouthful! Read More
(25)
Rating: 5 stars
02/11/2009
I thought this recipe was great! the breadcrumb/cornmeal mix was yummy and the carmelized onion was tasty and nice for presentation. I served over white rice and doubled the milk for the gravy since I had plenty of bread crumb mixture left. husband said it was interesting and different (than other chicken fried venison he'd had) but definitely good. I would even try frying veggies in this mix. I did think the egg/milk mixture was a little runny and I would have liked to taste more of the pepper sauce so I'd cut back on the milk there next time. Read More
(18)
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Rating: 5 stars
01/28/2011
Oh Deer!! These were fantastic steaks. Tender and tasty. I don't usually measure unless I'm baking but opted to do so with this recipe as it was my first time cooking venison and I didn't want to screw this up. I made a salt water brine and soaked my venison steaks for 4 hours prior to preparing them. I had 4 steaks and barely had enough of the breading mixture for all 4 so there wasn't any left for the gravy. Cooked these in my electric skillet at 325 degrees 4 minutes per side and didn't crowd the skillet (that lowers the oil's temperature and affects your final outcome) I've never caramelized onions in hot oil so I skipped that part. I caramelize using the low and slow method. I opted to make a simple bechamel sauce since I had no bread crumbs left. This was loved by the whole family and I tell you....I don't want another plain ol' chicken fried steak. I want mine to be made with venison from now on. Thanks so much for this recipe and for showing my husband that deer meat can be delicious when cooked properly. Read More
(7)
Rating: 5 stars
05/20/2009
I have been making a variation of this recipe for years. I don't use cornmeal and instead bread the steaks with flour. I also make plain white gravy. Mashed potatoes on the side is excellant. Everyone in my family loves this dish. Read More
(6)
Rating: 3 stars
06/06/2011
Everything was very tastey and since I field dress and butcher my own deer you couldn't even tell that it was venison. For the hot sauce I used sirachi. It's the perfect heat without an overwhelming hot sauce taste. I toasted the remaining crumbs and used the left over egg/milk mixture plus some additional milk to make the gravy. The flavor was fine but the texture wasn't right. Too gritty. I might use a little of the bread crumb mixture along with some flour the next time I make this dish. Read More
(4)
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Rating: 5 stars
11/25/2009
Family went nuts for this recipe - I am not the biggest fan of venison but I do like saving money when they get a deer. This made it much more tolerable for me to eat. I am sure I will make this again and again. Read More
(3)
Rating: 1 stars
12/03/2009
I followed this pretty closely and it is pretty much inedible. Way too much cornmeal and the gravy turned out thick as paste. I have to find something else for dinner now. Read More
(3)
Rating: 4 stars
03/02/2010
A new recipe for the menu rotation. We have LOTS of deer meat (that's the way we say it in the Ozarks) in the freezer. Never know what to do with ham steaks. Great! I just used regular flour for the gravy...didn't have any of the breadcrumb/cornmeal left after dredging. Good flavor. Didn't change a thing. Read More
(3)