Authentic chummus is very different and SO much tastier than its American counterpart. This chummus is creamy and delicate in taste rather than overpowered with garlic or thick and pasty. It is eaten warm, fresh, and as a whole meal spread out in a dish and drizzled with fresh olive oil. It is scooped up with pita, raw onion slices, or just a fork. Do NOT use canned chickpeas (garbanzo beans)!

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Ingredients

8
Original recipe yields 8 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Rinse the garbanzo beans and and place in a pot. Fill with enough water to cover by at least 1 inch. Add baking soda, if using. Bring to a boil and then simmer over medium heat until the beans are very soft, 1 1/2 to 2 hours.

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  • Drain the beans, reserving some of the water to use later. Reserve a small handful of the whole beans for a garnish. Transfer the rest to a blender or if you have a hand blender, a large bowl. Blend the beans until smooth, adding 1/2 cup of olive oil gradually. Add some of the reserved water if needed to help it blend. Add the tahini and blend in along with the lemon juice. Blend in the garlic, cumin and salt.

  • Spread the hummus into a flat serving dish and garnish with the reserved beans and a drizzle of olive oil.

Cook's Notes:

Use freshly squeezed lemon juice for best results. Add more lemon juice or garlic incrementally to suit your taste. Add enough hot water when blending so that the chummus becomes a smooth, rather thick dip rather than a clumpy paste. Chummus has a tendency to thicken up as it cools and water can be added later if desired. This chummus freezes very well and tastes fresh when defrosted.

For a fresher taste, use fresh, hot water to thin instead of the bean soaking liquid.

Nutrition Facts

550.8 calories; 18.4 g protein; 51.2 g carbohydrates; 0 mg cholesterol; 78.5 mg sodium. Full Nutrition

Reviews (87)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
03/09/2011
I'm the author of the recipe. Add as much garlic as you like. In the USA, you may need more than specified in the recipe since the garlic here in Israel is incredibly strong and potent. To the person who "knows" authentic chummus b/c you ate it at a few restaurants in Israel and Greece... um, well, which restaurants? Because unless you were eating in a restaurant that specialized in chummus, you were eating industrialized chummus--which is kind of like eating spaghetti at Sabarro (sp?) and saying that you know authentic Italian cuisine. Chummus is an art here and you've got to know where to go to find the good stuff. I'm not saying this recipe parallels Abu Chasan or Bahadonas, but for homemade chummus, it's pretty good. Read More
(176)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 1 stars
08/14/2008
This recipe was not authentic at ALL! I had hummus in several restaurants in Israel and Greece and none of them had the cumin in them. If you're looking for "authentic" then DON'T try this recipe! Read More
(29)
95 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 51
  • 4 star values: 28
  • 3 star values: 8
  • 2 star values: 1
  • 1 star values: 7
Rating: 5 stars
03/09/2011
I'm the author of the recipe. Add as much garlic as you like. In the USA, you may need more than specified in the recipe since the garlic here in Israel is incredibly strong and potent. To the person who "knows" authentic chummus b/c you ate it at a few restaurants in Israel and Greece... um, well, which restaurants? Because unless you were eating in a restaurant that specialized in chummus, you were eating industrialized chummus--which is kind of like eating spaghetti at Sabarro (sp?) and saying that you know authentic Italian cuisine. Chummus is an art here and you've got to know where to go to find the good stuff. I'm not saying this recipe parallels Abu Chasan or Bahadonas, but for homemade chummus, it's pretty good. Read More
(176)
Rating: 5 stars
05/24/2008
Delicious!!! For the Americans who can't do without garlic here is another way to add it without overpowering your hummus with it: In the last 5 minutes of your boiling water with beans add some whole cloves of garlic in the water and let them boil with your beans. Add them in the blender with the rest of your ingredients and bon appetit! Read More
(87)
Rating: 5 stars
04/04/2008
Finally! I went to Israel on a tour in 2006 and ate hummus every chance I had. Since then I have not found a recipe or store brand that I thought was close to authentic. This is fabulous. It is so creamy and mild and my husband is glad that I don't smell like garlic! The cumin gives it a good flavor and I added just a dash of cayenne to give a little kick. Cooking the dry beans instead of using canned also makes this a much fresher tasting dish. Thanks. Now if I could only find some fresh pita bread! Read More
(54)
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Rating: 1 stars
08/13/2008
This recipe was not authentic at ALL! I had hummus in several restaurants in Israel and Greece and none of them had the cumin in them. If you're looking for "authentic" then DON'T try this recipe! Read More
(29)
Rating: 5 stars
01/27/2009
Excellent recipe and very authentic. I am Lebanese and the cumin makes it much more like the genuine hummus I had as a kid. Perfect! Read More
(27)
Rating: 5 stars
12/28/2011
This is almost the same recipe I have used for years. Shown how to make by a friend as my family members did not make this. Home cooked beans are far superior to canned and much more economical. Homemade hummus (or just about anything homemade for that matter) is superior to any pre-made full of preservative thing you buy at the store. To those of you who have commented that the texture is coarse either your beans are not cooked enough and/or you have not blended the hummus long enough at 5 minutes in my high powered blender it is smooth silky and fluffy. Blend puree or process until you have the correct texture! Cumin is an authentic Near and Middle Eastern seasoning garlic if used it is just a whisper. Remember this is not an American grocery store clone. This is the real stuff probably a recipe passed from an elder relative to a younger one including the most special ingredient of all love! So if you must add the whole bulb of garlic roasted red pepper or a hot pepper or two more or less tahini and lemon juice or whatever else you want to make it with love and then it will be authentic to you and your family. Oh I almost forgot my favorite way to eat it is warm on freshly baked homemade pita bread or soft lavosh some nice salty cured olives on the side! Yum!!!!!! Read More
(26)
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Rating: 2 stars
12/02/2008
Every middle easterner knows hummus isn't real hummus without garlic it's essential. Mince a few cloves to this recipe and you'll love it. Read More
(18)
Rating: 5 stars
08/05/2008
The texture is amazing. Absolutely genuine flavors however when cooking my beans I threw in a couple crushed garlic cloves that kicked up the flavor just enough to give a plain cracker some taste if you're not eating it with pita bread. Goes great with apples pretzels bagel sandwich spread EVERYTHING! Read More
(15)
Rating: 5 stars
05/17/2008
The perfect hummus recipe! Thanks for posting this recipe. This hummus was very creamy and delicious. I followed the exact recipe except that I used canned chickpeas instead of fresh. I used one can of chickpeas reserving half of the liquid in the can to use in the hummus. I also halved the rest of the ingredients but used only 1/3 cup of the tahini. Very yummy. If you like garlic go ahead and add a few cloves but I found that this recipe doesn't need the garlic. Read More
(13)