An oldie but a goody, this is one of the world's first cocktails, invented in New Orleans in the 19th century.

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Recipe Summary

prep:
5 mins
total:
5 mins
Servings:
1
Yield:
1 drink
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Ingredients

1
Original recipe yields 1 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Store a cocktail glass in the freezer for 15 to 20 minutes before making the cocktail.

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  • Pour the anise flavored liqueur into the frosted glass and turn to coat the sides. Dump excess liqueur in the sink (or drink it!). Add sugar, water and bitters to the glass, stirring to dissolve. Strain into the glass and pour in the rye. Stir and garnish with a twist of lemon.

Nutrition Facts

161 calories; protein 0g; carbohydrates 3.9g 1% DV; fat 0g; cholesterol 0mg; sodium 0.9mg. Full Nutrition
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Reviews (7)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
12/22/2008
Unusual tasty unusually tasty drink! The original Sazerac called for infamous absinthe (which I think can be had these days legally) and rye whiskey. I made mine with bourbon Pernod and angostura bitters (most everyone recommends Peychaud's). I loved it. But I'm looking forward to trying it with the above changes like good ol' Antoine intended. Read More
(53)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 3 stars
02/24/2009
Sazerac should not have ice in the glass. You should chill or freeze the glass for about 30 minutes and then strain the liquid from your cocktail shaker and drink straight. The chilled glass and the shaking with the ice will make the drink cold. Read More
(35)
9 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 7
  • 4 star values: 1
  • 3 star values: 1
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 1 star values: 0
Rating: 5 stars
12/22/2008
Unusual tasty unusually tasty drink! The original Sazerac called for infamous absinthe (which I think can be had these days legally) and rye whiskey. I made mine with bourbon Pernod and angostura bitters (most everyone recommends Peychaud's). I loved it. But I'm looking forward to trying it with the above changes like good ol' Antoine intended. Read More
(53)
Rating: 5 stars
12/21/2009
I agree with all foregoing remarks, and will add that the lemon twist is a deal breaker. It not only must be there, but must have enough oil that it can be "twisted" such that at least a couple drops of oil are supplanted to the surface of the completed drink. Your nose needs to pick up some of the lemon fragrance as the drink approaches your face and is imbibed. Read More
(38)
Rating: 3 stars
02/24/2009
Sazerac should not have ice in the glass. You should chill or freeze the glass for about 30 minutes and then strain the liquid from your cocktail shaker and drink straight. The chilled glass and the shaking with the ice will make the drink cold. Read More
(35)
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Rating: 4 stars
07/14/2009
the anise flavored liquer should be swilled around the glass then tossed. This is an excellent drink and my family recently had our first ones at The Carolina in Pinehurst in honor of my uncle Ted. (had to tell them how to make it though..lol) Read More
(18)
Rating: 5 stars
11/27/2009
The original recipe calls for rye whisky instead of bourbon. What a great cocktail! Read More
(8)
Rating: 5 stars
07/01/2012
Reminds me fondly of New Orleans pre Katrina (It just will never be the same as my memories) The Sazerac Bar/Blue Room/the shows/Monteleon/I learned to waltz @the Blue Room standing on my pappys shoes. Such memories R PRECIOUS to me as I had a brain aneurysm in 2005. All my grands & my daddy have since died. Daddy met 'annie' @ the same age I was. I 4got to die!!!! (He didn't ) Read More
(3)
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Rating: 5 stars
03/03/2019
Very good but I will try more bitters and less rhy next time. Read More
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