This simple way of making a beef reduction takes two days, but requires very little work. We buy a hind quarter of beef every 2 months. I use this recipe to make use of the leftover bones from the leg section. I don't add any vegetables or spices with this because I want to be able to control the flavor of sauce I want later. This simply creates a good starting point for a sauce.

Semi

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Recipe Summary

cook:
1 day
additional:
2 hrs
total:
1 day
Servings:
4
Yield:
1 quart
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Ingredients

4
Original recipe yields 4 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Combine the bones and water in a large stockpot. Bring the mixture to a boil. Maintain a low boil for 24 hours, adding water to keep the bones submerged. Remove and discard the bones. Allow mixture to simmer another 21 to 22 hours. Strain the liquid through a fine-mesh colander and return to the stockpot. Bring to a boil and cook until liquid has reduced to about 2 quarts.

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  • Transfer the stock to heat-safe containers; freeze. Once frozen, there should be three easily-discernable layers. Remove and discard the top-most of those three layers. Thaw remaining portion to use.

Nutrition Facts

sodium 28.4mg. Full Nutrition
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Reviews (18)

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Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
09/08/2009
This is a purist's dream beef stock. Beautiful! Read More
(27)
19 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 18
  • 4 star values: 1
  • 3 star values: 0
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 1 star values: 0
Rating: 5 stars
09/08/2009
This is a purist's dream beef stock. Beautiful! Read More
(27)
Rating: 5 stars
10/07/2010
I love this looks like its a pain to make - but so much more healthy. Look at the sodium content on canned or boxed stocks this has much more flavour and you get a whole lot which is easy to freeze for later use. Loved it! Read More
(22)
Rating: 5 stars
03/26/2012
Thank you for the clearinstructions. I have always wanted to be able to make this and I agree that the pure beef flavor makes the most useful and versatile stock. Since today's slow cookers are set at a higher temperature than the ones originally made it is nw perfectly possible to make this stock in one of them from start to finish. I buy beef bones from an Asian market (in case you can't find them in hyour supermarket). Read More
(20)
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Rating: 5 stars
04/30/2015
This is how I make my stock. The only thing I do different is to roast them for an hour at 350 degrees first. I also put cheesecloth over my strainer and that helps catch all those fine particles. Read More
(7)
Rating: 5 stars
01/27/2015
This recipe is indeed easy but it is time consuming! If you want to do this on a weekend start on Friday night after dinner. I had to interrupt the cooking time because I didn't start until Saturday morning. It didn't hurt a thing in fact it probably helped me manage it because refrigerating it after removing bones and straining allowed the fat to congeal for easy removal. Also bonus: my strainer did not get the finer particles out which I discovered after refrigeration. They settled to the bottom and I was able to remove before the final reduction. Beautiful healthy beef stock with a surprisingly good color. I think next time I will roast the bones prior to simmering for an even deeper color and flavor. Thanks for your clear instructions! Read More
(6)
Rating: 5 stars
09/24/2014
This is perfect for a healthy no-frills stock. When done cooking let cool slightly then pour into ice cube trays and freeze. Much easier for portions. Read More
(6)
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Rating: 5 stars
04/30/2015
I made this and it's absolutely divine! I could get beef bones at my local grocery store that has the best meat next to a butcher which we don't have in our small town. I split the bones up into five pound packages and used two large crock pots and it turned out perfectly. I froze it in small portions popped it out and stored it in large zip top bags. When I wanted it I just reached in and got what I needed. Read More
(3)
Rating: 5 stars
04/30/2015
I went out and bought bones and just started it. To Chris Lidberg the butcher uses a saw to cut the bones up. My name brand grocery stores don't do actually butchering anymore; their stuff comes prepacked. I went to the carneceria. Read More
(2)
Rating: 5 stars
04/30/2015
to answer Chris Lidberg's question; the bones are usualy sold at the market cut into managable pieces but you can always ask the buther/meat department to cut them up for you. Read More
(2)
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