A bona fide Southern tradition! Authentic Southern corn pone is never sweet, and is baked in a cast iron skillet. Just like Grandma used to make!

Aggie

Recipe Summary

prep:
20 mins
cook:
25 mins
total:
45 mins
Servings:
8
Yield:
1 corn pone cake
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Ingredients

8
Original recipe yields 8 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Preheat oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C). Place a 9 inch cast iron skillet on the center rack.

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  • When the skillet is hot, carefully remove the skillet from the oven. Pour the canola oil into the skillet and gently swirl the pan to coat the bottom and the sides. Return the pan to the oven for ten minutes.

  • While the oil is heating, mix together the cornmeal and salt in a medium bowl. Add the eggs and buttermilk and mix together to make a thin batter.

  • Carefully pull out the rack with the cast iron skillet and pour the batter into the preheated skillet.

  • Bake the corn pone until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, 20 to 25 minutes. If desired, turn the oven to broil for the last few minutes of baking to brown the top.

  • Remove the skillet from the oven and shake the pan to loosen the corn pone from the skillet. Serve the corn pone warm from the skillet or turn out onto a plate.

Nutrition Facts

179 calories; protein 4.8g 10% DV; carbohydrates 19.6g 6% DV; fat 9.4g 15% DV; cholesterol 48.1mg 16% DV; sodium 504.4mg 20% DV. Full Nutrition

Reviews (19)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
08/03/2009
My grandmother in Texas made corn pone for our family when I was a kid. She made individual servings by forming them in her hands. They were wonderful! I am now 77 and remembering the "good old days. Read More
(99)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 3 stars
04/29/2008
This our standard way to make pan cornbread. Corn pone is hand formed and is shaped something like hands folded in prayer. It is "grown" in a 425/450 deg. oven till the outside is medium brown and crispy while the inside is moist and soft. At least here in the foothills we've been making it this way since out of memory........Also; you bet! Sugar is for cakes, cookies and iced tea, not cornmeal goodies. Patrick Read More
(101)
22 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 12
  • 4 star values: 3
  • 3 star values: 3
  • 2 star values: 3
  • 1 star values: 1
Rating: 3 stars
04/29/2008
This our standard way to make pan cornbread. Corn pone is hand formed and is shaped something like hands folded in prayer. It is "grown" in a 425/450 deg. oven till the outside is medium brown and crispy while the inside is moist and soft. At least here in the foothills we've been making it this way since out of memory........Also; you bet! Sugar is for cakes, cookies and iced tea, not cornmeal goodies. Patrick Read More
(101)
Rating: 5 stars
08/03/2009
My grandmother in Texas made corn pone for our family when I was a kid. She made individual servings by forming them in her hands. They were wonderful! I am now 77 and remembering the "good old days. Read More
(99)
Rating: 4 stars
08/29/2011
Our old mountain family recipe uses no eggs. We add a little more buttermilk and 2 teaspoons baking SODA. We preheat the skillet with the oil in it (bacon grease in the old days). The batter sizzles when it is poured into the skillet. A little oil is tilted up over the top of the batter. After baking, turn out bread onto tea towel and wrap it up for about 10 minutes before serving. Firm crispy crust with dense creamy center. Read More
(64)
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Rating: 3 stars
11/29/2013
This recipe makes a dense product that is easy to toss together on a week night to add a special touch to any meal. Best served warm. Makes a great snack at work the next day too. FYI this is NOT corn bread and the recipe as is produces a plain flavored product. Use of a heated cast iron skillet adds to the crispy-ness of the outside of the pone too. Read More
(6)
Rating: 5 stars
03/17/2015
Making this right now! Sounds good my great grandmother used to make pone bread and i remember it being salty and crumbly i dont like sweet cornbread at all. So i hope this comes close to hers. Only thing i am going to change is instead of canola oil i am using bacon grease. Read More
(5)
Rating: 2 stars
08/01/2011
It was okay but not my thing. Dense and bland. I added flour sugar and baking powder to the rest of the batter and they rose nicely. I guess I'm more of a traditional cornbread gal. Read More
(3)
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Rating: 5 stars
01/27/2016
I liked it but my wife didn't. This has totally different texture. Dense and firm since there is no leavening agents involved. I think that next time I will substitute bacon grease for the canola oil though. Read More
(2)
Rating: 2 stars
10/09/2011
Extremely salty- we couldn't eat it. Otherwise it seemed good (texture etc.) Read More
(1)
Rating: 5 stars
04/11/2014
This simple and easy recipe makes a delicious bread that's perfect for breakfasts. Two suggestions: (1) Use half the salt; (2) Bake 30 minutes (this will vary according to your oven of course but mine requires more than 20-25 to get this bread crispy). Incidentally it's not entirely clear to me whether this is in fact authentic corn pone; Wikipedia (for what it's worth) characterizes corn pone as milk-less and egg-less. By whatever name this recipe is becoming a classic staple in our family. Read More
(1)