Eat to your heart's content the day after and/or freeze in several units. Take out of the freezer and heat in the zapper or in a double boiler. Enjoy that T-Day turkey until New Year's. Despite the name it is a really great soup that my sister's friend shared with me. This recipe is meant to use up any leftover vegetables and other ingredients; leftover green beans would make a great addition. Celery, onions, spinach and cabbage are tasty, too!

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Ingredients

8
Original recipe yields 8 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Pick your Thanksgiving turkey nearly clean. (Turkey salad is great for a few days, or even turkey pot pies.) We are not real concerned about the choice meat here. Dump the turkey and all of its debris, including the juices, into a large pot. Add green beans, celery, spinach, cabbage, and white rice. Pour in enough water to cover everything.

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  • Bring soup to a boil. Reduce heat, and simmer for an hour or so. Add more water as needed.

  • Remove all turkey bones and unwanted debris (i.e., skin, cartilage, etc.). There you have it. It's kind of a culinary scrapbook of your Turkey Day.

Nutrition Facts

214.2 calories; 4.9 g protein; 43.9 g carbohydrates; 3.8 mg cholesterol; 182.2 mg sodium. Full Nutrition

Reviews (32)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
01/03/2004
Excellent. Make the day after Thanksgiving or freeze the carcass/skin then defrost to make recipe later. Use a crock pot/slow cooker (or pressure cooker) & make it even easier on yourself. Just make certain you cover the carcass entirely with water. Sometimes I use 3 parts water & 1 part canned broth to enhance flavor. I use a strainer over a bowl to strain out the bones/skin & retain the yummy soup. This is easier than trying to pick out bones by hand unless you have a big Chinese strainer "spoon". This works for me too. Read More
(42)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 3 stars
12/29/2003
My problem with this soup is the method. As written, you end up sorting though the vegetables to fish out the bones, fine if you get them all, dangerous and messy if you don't. I like to boil the turkey carcass in water with onions, celery, herbs, and carrots added for flavor, then strain the broth and put it out on the porch until the fat rises. I throw away the fat and cook the "final" vegetables in the strained broth. Takes a bit longer, but surely less of a mess. The flavor of the soup is great, though, as long as you don't use too much water. By making the broth before adding the final vegetables, you have the option of cooking down the broth to concentrate it if needed. This broth is rich in calcium because of the bones, for an additional bonus. Read More
(122)
37 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 13
  • 4 star values: 12
  • 3 star values: 7
  • 2 star values: 4
  • 1 star values: 1
Rating: 5 stars
01/03/2004
Excellent. Make the day after Thanksgiving or freeze the carcass/skin then defrost to make recipe later. Use a crock pot/slow cooker (or pressure cooker) & make it even easier on yourself. Just make certain you cover the carcass entirely with water. Sometimes I use 3 parts water & 1 part canned broth to enhance flavor. I use a strainer over a bowl to strain out the bones/skin & retain the yummy soup. This is easier than trying to pick out bones by hand unless you have a big Chinese strainer "spoon". This works for me too. Read More
(42)
Rating: 3 stars
12/29/2003
My problem with this soup is the method. As written, you end up sorting though the vegetables to fish out the bones, fine if you get them all, dangerous and messy if you don't. I like to boil the turkey carcass in water with onions, celery, herbs, and carrots added for flavor, then strain the broth and put it out on the porch until the fat rises. I throw away the fat and cook the "final" vegetables in the strained broth. Takes a bit longer, but surely less of a mess. The flavor of the soup is great, though, as long as you don't use too much water. By making the broth before adding the final vegetables, you have the option of cooking down the broth to concentrate it if needed. This broth is rich in calcium because of the bones, for an additional bonus. Read More
(122)
Rating: 2 stars
01/06/2004
This recipe should be rewritten. A novice might believe that 5 cups of water is correct, it is not. That depends on the carcass size. Also, the rice will turn to mush and picking the carcass bones out of the "soup" is a mess. There are better recipes for turkey soup. Read More
(69)
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Rating: 5 stars
01/03/2004
Excellent. Make the day after Thanksgiving or freeze the carcass/skin then defrost to make recipe later. Use a crock pot/slow cooker (or pressure cooker) & make it even easier on yourself. Just make certain you cover the carcass entirely with water. Sometimes I use 3 parts water & 1 part canned broth to enhance flavor. I use a strainer over a bowl to strain out the bones/skin & retain the yummy soup. This is easier than trying to pick out bones by hand unless you have a big Chinese strainer "spoon". This works for me too. Read More
(42)
Rating: 5 stars
10/19/2005
Personally I make my broth the way PatsyK describes below. The only difference is that prior to simmering the bones and stock veggies I roast the broken up carcass/skin/meat in the oven at a high heat turning regularly. This adds a really good flavor to the stock and also turns it a nice golden brown color. Read More
(37)
Rating: 4 stars
09/20/2006
As is this recipe is a great inspiration. However, I did things slightly different and it made a great soup. Here is what I did...I used the carcass from my Crock Pot Turkey Breast and all of the juice in the bottom of the crock pot, 1 box of chicken broth, 3 bay leaves, 2 carrots, 2 ribs celery, 1 tsp poultry seasoning and cracked black pepper, brought to a boil for 1 hour. Drained out the bones etc and disgarded. Then refrigerated stock overnight and skimmed. Then I dumped stock in my crock pot and added two cans mixed veggies drained and about 2 cups of turkey I got off of the carcus and cooked all day on low. Just before sserving I dumped in two cups of cooked white rice. And walla a great turkey rice soup. Thanks for the inspiration. Read More
(30)
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Rating: 4 stars
06/29/2004
I used this recipe with a few changes based on other reviews. Omit the rice. Add wide egg noodles the last 15 minutes. I used the spices that I would use with chicken soup. Oregano basil bay leaves majoram ground thyme salt pepper and a little lemon juice. Tastes great and made a whole pot of soup with what I would have thrown away. Thank you. Read More
(26)
Rating: 3 stars
12/27/2003
Good but kind of bland. Had to doctor with herbs and chicken stock. Not enough broth in soup. Read More
(25)
Rating: 3 stars
06/17/2005
Cooked the carcass with carrots & celery and then strained and threw away veggies bones etc. I then finished the recipe. It needs salt and pepper badly. Leftovers froze well. Read More
(21)
Rating: 4 stars
10/09/2003
I like to add other leftovers to this soup, such as left over spinach, sweet and white potatoes, celery, carrots, onion, parsnip, peas, corn, whatever is around. Barley or orzo also goes well in the soup. Sometimes I will process half of the cooked soup to thicken it. Read More
(20)