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Easy Canned Venison

Rated as 4.85 out of 5 Stars
0

"Make easy and quick meals with canned venison in stews, soups, sandwiches, or just heat and serve with rice, potatoes, or noodles and vegetable. The meat can be warmed and eaten as is or used in stews, chili or hot dishes or in sandwiches. Use the scaling feature to scale this recipe to the number of pounds of venison you have to can."
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Ingredients

5 h 30 m servings 128
Original recipe yields 4 servings (1 pint jar)

Directions

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  1. Place the venison into a large bowl. Sprinkle with salt, pepper, and garlic; toss to combine. Place venison into canning jar along with onion and bell pepper. Jars should be filled to within 1/2 inch of the top. Wipe rim with a clean, damp cloth, and seal with lid and ring.
  2. Place jar into a pressure canner filled with water according to manufacturer's directions. Affix lid and bring to a boil with the pressure valve open. Boil for 5 minutes before closing the pressure valve. Bring to a pressure of 10 psi, then reduce heat in order to maintain this pressure. Process for 75 minutes, watching gauge closely so the pressure stays at 10 psi. After 75 minutes, turn off heat and allow the canner to cool until the gauge reads 0 psi.
  3. Once the pressure has subsided and the canner is safe to open, remove the jar to cool on a rack. The jar will seal with a pop as it cools; refrigerate the jar if it does not seal. Properly sealed jars may be stored in a cool, dark area.

Nutrition Facts


Per Serving: 128 calories; 2.5 1.7 23.3 86 610 Full nutrition

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Reviews

Read all reviews 22
  1. 27 Ratings

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    Rated as 5 out of 5 Stars
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    Rated as 1 out of 5 Stars
Most helpful positive review

This is great! I can everything but the back straps, and it tastes great from head to tail! And it does not matter if its an old buck or a little doe it always comes out delicious!

Most helpful critical review

You don't state what size jar you are using, pints? If so, quarts should be processed for 90 minutes, correct?

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This is great! I can everything but the back straps, and it tastes great from head to tail! And it does not matter if its an old buck or a little doe it always comes out delicious!

Very good, very easy, great way to use venison. I always do venison this way. When butchering, I save the back straps, loins, jerky roasts, and some for burger or brats. Then I can the rest. It ...

In the past I have done something similar but only used kosher salt. The minced garlic and onion add to it. I love having the meat canned - it is super easy to make deer and noodles or stews/sou...

I'm not the biggest fan of venison, but this recipe is delicious. We got an old buck this year and I was concerned it might be too game-y. I mostly followed the recipe (without the peppers), b...

You don't state what size jar you are using, pints? If so, quarts should be processed for 90 minutes, correct?

We love canned venison and with several deer hunters in our house this is a great way to use some of the meat. People that swear they won't eat venison, love this and usually ask to take a jar...

Rather than salt, I use 2 bouillon cubes, as they are mostly salt, and add a little flavor. (I do quart jars). Some jars get a few mushrooms added as well. 4 or five jalapeno slices add a nice m...

I love this recipe but I do add one clove garlic per quart jar adding equal amount spices, onion,peppers divided up for each jar for more exact flavor. Makes excellant sandwich spread when you o...

If you are canning meat, you MUST use a pressure canner. Meat is a low acid food and a hot water bath canner will not heat up enough to kill botulism spores no matter how long you can them. Only...