This is a baked version of the Chinese Gau, a dessert that is usually steamed and served for Chinese New Years.

Recipe Summary

prep:
15 mins
cook:
50 mins
total:
1 hr 5 mins
Servings:
48
Yield:
96 pieces
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Ingredients

48
Original recipe yields 48 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Line an 8x12 inch pan with aluminum foil, going up the sides.

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  • Sift the rice flour, brown sugar, white sugar, and baking soda into a large bowl. Make a well in the center and pour in the coconut milk, milk, and vanilla extract. Stir together until smooth. Pour the batter into the prepared pan, and sprinkle sesame seeds over the top.

  • Bake in the preheated oven until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean, 50 to 55 minutes. Let cool in pan for 30 minutes, then remove the foil and place on a cutting board top side up. Cut into 1 inch squares.

Nutrition Facts

104 calories; protein 1.2g; carbohydrates 20.5g; fat 2.2g; cholesterol 0.8mg; sodium 34.1mg. Full Nutrition
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Reviews (8)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 4 stars
08/25/2009
I made this for my husband who loves rice cake and he loved it! The texture was better when it cooled off and I added some nuts (peacant & almond)and will add walnuts next time. I also didn't put any white sugar put less brown sugar than suggested (about a half cup less) it was still sweet enough. also little less milk. Read More
(11)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 3 stars
11/05/2013
Interesting dessert... sticky and almost like a jelly custard. Read More
(4)
14 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 7
  • 4 star values: 5
  • 3 star values: 2
  • 2 star values: 0
  • 1 star values: 0
Rating: 4 stars
08/25/2009
I made this for my husband who loves rice cake and he loved it! The texture was better when it cooled off and I added some nuts (peacant & almond)and will add walnuts next time. I also didn't put any white sugar put less brown sugar than suggested (about a half cup less) it was still sweet enough. also little less milk. Read More
(11)
Rating: 4 stars
12/02/2007
I would suggest making this recipe in half it makes quite a lot yummy while hot. sweet and chewy with a hint of coconut. Read More
(8)
Rating: 4 stars
03/04/2009
i made this for my sons class project on china a picture would have been nice. i dont know if it turned out right. It is like a soft carmel or a hard sticky jelly with a crispy crust on top. a little plain lightly sweet very sticky. Read More
(6)
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Rating: 3 stars
11/05/2013
Interesting dessert... sticky and almost like a jelly custard. Read More
(4)
Rating: 4 stars
02/08/2016
I usually make steamed Chinese cakes but wanted to try this. The crispy edges are so yummy that I always want to steal the corner pieces for myself! For a half recipe I used an 8" square pan. The gao rises a fair bit but then deflates rapidly when out of the oven creating the nice crackly 'crust' on top. I've made this recipe using reduced and substitute sugars as well as the original recipe--both ways are fine. BTW you can always steam this as originally intended.:) Read More
(4)
Rating: 5 stars
01/26/2015
I love these bake version than the traditional steam method. It's so easy and fast. How ever I did omit the white sugar and it is sweet enough for me. I also find its easier to use scissors to cut it into bite size. Thank you for sharing the recipe. Read More
(3)
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Rating: 5 stars
01/19/2019
This is the first time I made this type of mocha. I took it to a small party and it was GONE. Everyone loves it. Read More
Rating: 5 stars
01/26/2020
Best baked gau ever! I would definitely make again! Would recommend cutting with kitchen scissors or a really sharp knife to get perfect edges! Read More
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