A traditional Swedish Christmas recipe, they are crispy, brown, and delicious plain or decorated. Different from your everyday gingersnap!

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Ingredients

60
Original recipe yields 60 servings
The ingredient list now reflects the servings specified
Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • Place butter in a large, heatproof bowl. In a medium saucepan, heat brown sugar, molasses and spices just to boiling point. Add baking soda and stir in. Pour this mixture over the butter and stir until it melts.

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  • Beat egg and mix in; add flour, a cup at a time, and blend thoroughly. Turn out onto a lightly floured board and knead 1-2 minutes. Wrap in waxed paper and chill until firm (about an hour).

  • Preheat oven to 325 degrees F (170 degrees C).

  • Roll out to approximately 1/8 inch thickness on a lightly floured board and cut into desired shapes. Place on greased baking sheets and bake for 8 - 10 minutes.

  • Remove from sheets and cool on racks; may be decorated with piped icing or whatever else you like!

Nutrition Facts

65.9 calories; 0.9 g protein; 10.8 g carbohydrates; 8.5 mg cholesterol; 62 mg sodium. Full Nutrition

Reviews (6)

Read More Reviews

Most helpful positive review

Rating: 5 stars
12/21/2003
the very best pepparkakor recipe i have found. it rolls very easily. the only thing i would change is the amount of spices - i would almost double everything - the cinnamon ginger cloves. i also added some orange zest which gave it a nice flavor. Read More
(40)

Most helpful critical review

Rating: 2 stars
01/24/2003
I live in Sweden and gave this recipe to my daughter in the states. She said that they were definately not like the swedish pepparkakor we bake in Sweden. This recipe has less spices and more flour. My daughter said that when she added more of the spices and less flour that they tasted much better. Read More
(80)
9 Ratings
  • 5 star values: 6
  • 4 star values: 0
  • 3 star values: 0
  • 2 star values: 2
  • 1 star values: 1
Rating: 2 stars
01/24/2003
I live in Sweden and gave this recipe to my daughter in the states. She said that they were definately not like the swedish pepparkakor we bake in Sweden. This recipe has less spices and more flour. My daughter said that when she added more of the spices and less flour that they tasted much better. Read More
(80)
Rating: 5 stars
12/20/2003
the very best pepparkakor recipe i have found. it rolls very easily. the only thing i would change is the amount of spices - i would almost double everything - the cinnamon ginger cloves. i also added some orange zest which gave it a nice flavor. Read More
(40)
Rating: 1 stars
01/24/2003
5 cups of flour? It seemed like too much. The "dough" was more like sand and you can't roll out sand as the recipe instructs. Another recipe for pepparkakor calls for 3-1/2 c. flour which seems more in line for the correct amount to add. Read More
(19)
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Rating: 2 stars
12/16/2003
I made this recipe because it sounded close to an original I have from a Swedish friend. However the dough was very hard to work with it was too wet. The cookies turned out okay but even though I doubled the spices they weren't that spicy. I would not make these again. I'm sorry I didn't take the time to convert the recipe from my friend into English measurements! Read More
(10)
Rating: 5 stars
12/07/2008
This recipe is just great! I used cane molasses and just had to add a little flour but it was really easy to roll out thin and cut. The flavour is fantastic: just the right amount of spices to suit both my mom's (who's a big pepparkakor fan) tastes and mine. I'm definitely going to bake these again for Christmas. Read More
(6)
Rating: 5 stars
06/13/2016
Thank you Kathy for posting this recipe. I did double the spices because I love them. The molasses gave the cookies a mild bitterness that was delicious. The process for making the cookies was unusual but the results were dark brown crisp and very pretty. My husband called them 'adult' cookies. Ha. Read More
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