The Space-Saving Bucket That Makes Kitchen Composting Easier

Whether you are new to composting or an old hand at keeping food scraps out of the landfill, this $17 bin can make it easier to do the better-for-the-planet thing.
By Nichole Aksamit
September 05, 2020
Each product we feature has been independently selected and reviewed by our editorial team. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

These days, it feels more important than ever to minimize food waste, return nutrients to the soil, and curb harmful emissions by keeping compostable food scraps out of the landfill. And in my kitchen, I’ve long been committed to using every last edible bit and composting things like coffee grounds, egg shells, fruit peels, and veggie trimmings.

That said, after reattaching the rusted handle of my metal compost bucket for the third time in a year, I knew something had to change. My good-for-the-earth habit needed to become more convenient to me.

Enter the KaryHome Kitchen Compost Bin, $18 at Amazon. Dealing with kitchen food scraps has gotten so much easier since I got this tidy little bin. It hangs on hooks over the door (or on an adhesive mount on the back of the door) of the cabinet under your sink, making use of that otherwise wasted space. It slides off its mount easily if you want to set it in the sink or on the counter for mega prep sessions or take it elsewhere to empty or clean it. 

Made of seamless plastic, it has no nooks or crannies for gunk to get stuck in and nothing that can corrode or rust. If you use a compostable bag liner, it has a rim that locks the liner in place, too, so you’re never fishing the liner out of the scraps. The flat lid traps in odors, doesn’t require a filter, and over several months of steady use, has not attracted fruit flies.

At about 10 inches tall, 8 inches wide, and 7 inches deep (about as big as a shoe box), it’s compact for small spaces but somehow seems roomier than the standard cylinder buckets. Mine is plain white, but it now comes in other colors, too. I removed the little black sticker on the side, and it looks even tidier without it.

How you turn your kitchen scraps into compost depends a little on your space, your yard, and your situation. You can empty them into a worm-based or heat-based composter if you have the room, bury them in a small compost pile if you have a yard or garden space, or set them out with other compostables if your town or local food coop offers curbside collection. But whatever option you choose, it all begins in the kitchen, one good little bucket at a time.

To buy: KaryHome Kitchen Compost Bin, $18; amazon.com