Ashkenazi Hanukkah Recipes

Jewish Style Sweet and Sour Brisket
Photo: Allrecipes Magazine

Many of the classic Jewish dishes we know come from Ashkenazi Jews from Northern and Eastern Europe. Fried foods are always eaten on Hanukkah to celebrate the miracle of a little oil that lit the menorah for eight days and nights. It's also tradition to eat dairy in honor of Judith, a Jewish widow who plied the Assyrian king with lots of cheese and wine. When he passed out, she cut off his head and saved the Jewish people from attack. Ashkenazi dishes celebrate both fried foods and dairy, with fried latkes and jelly doughnuts, and creamy noodle kugel and blintzes.

01 of 10

Kerry's Sweet Potato Latkes

Kerry's Sweet Potato Latkes
Allrecipes Magazine

Russet potatoes may be the traditional spud used in latkes, but sweet potato latkes go so well with the classic Ashkenazi latke toppers of sour cream and applesauce. "I was eating them as I was cooking them and could not stop!" Karina says.

02 of 10

Spiced Orange Olive Oil Cake

Spiced Orange Olive Oil Cake
ChefJackie

Fried foods aren't the only way to celebrate Hanukkah. This loaf cake is all about the olive oil, with 2/3 cup in the batter. It gives the cake a dense, moist crumb, and goes well with the floral fresh orange zest.

03 of 10

Carrot Tzimmes

Carrot Tzimmes
lutzflcat

Tzimmes is a classic Ashkenazi dish of sweet glazed carrots and dried fruit like raisins or prunes. It's usually enjoyed at the Jewish New Year, but you'll also find it at Passover and Hanukkah.

04 of 10

Jewish Style Sweet and Sour Brisket

Jewish Style Sweet and Sour Brisket
Allrecipes Magazine

You'll find brisket on just about every Jewish holiday table, especially Hanukkah. Brisket can often be dried and tough, but this recipe is anything but. Reviewers like Michelle Spier raved, "This is the best brisket recipe I have made. It came out perfect."

05 of 10

Jelly Doughnuts

Jelly Doughnuts
LaMiaItalia

Filled doughnuts are called soufganiyot, and are almost as traditional as latkes at Hanukkah. Maeven6 had great results: "The kids loved making them after they came out of the [bread] machine and eating them even better."

06 of 10

Cinnamon Noodle Kugel

Cinnamon Noodle Kugel
Cinnamon Noodle Kugel. Elise Contarsy

This Ashkenazi dish is actually served with the main meal, despite being sweet enough to be enjoyed for dessert. Cottage cheese, sour cream, and milk create a no-cook custard for the egg noodles that will thicken as it bakes.

07 of 10

Potato Latkes I

Potato Latkes I with green onions and sour creaam
Montana

Potato latkes, or pancakes, are a must on Hanukkah. This recipe is about as classic (and simple) as it gets. Laura K says, "These latkes were so awesome, just like my grandmother and mom used to make." We can't think of higher praise.

08 of 10

Bubbie's Hearty Matzo Ball Soup

Bubbie's Hearty Matzo Ball Soup
Linda T

Though usually associated with Passover, matzo ball soup is an anytime dish for Ashkenazi Jews, and so comforting in winter. You can also use matzo meal in place of flour in your latke batter.

09 of 10

Marylyn's Cheese Blintzes

Marylyn's Cheese Blintzes
Deb C

Ashkenazi Jews invented the blintz — a thin, crepe-like pancake wrapped around a cheesy filling. The combination of cottage cheese, farmer's cheese, and sour cream is a total winner, according to sal pal. "Just the filling I was looking for!"

10 of 10

Apricot Almond Rugalach

Apricot Almond Rugalach
SALONFOODIE

The dough for these cookies includes a little cream cheese, making it easy to roll out and the cookie so flaky and tender. "These are my secret weapon over the holidays," says veronica7.

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