Best chili ever, and addictive. After living in Cincinnati (and trying Greek-style Skyline "chili"), I picked up some traditional spice road additions to make my mom's original recipe even better. Whenever I make this, I get lots of requests to share my secret ingredients. Well it's no secret! You can make it in a rush in about an hour, or let it simmer in a crock pot all afternoon for true deliciousness. Serve with cornbread or corn pudding and shredded cheddar cheese.

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Recipe Summary

cook:
50 mins
prep:
15 mins
total:
1 hr 5 mins
Servings:
20
Yield:
about 1 1/2 gallons
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Ingredients

Ingredient Checklist

Directions

Instructions Checklist
  • STOVE TOP:

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  • 1. In a large soup pot, brown beef and pork in pan. Drain off any fat. Add onions, bell peppers, hot pepper, and garlic, stirring occaisonally until onions start turning soft.

  • 2. Open the cans of whole tomatoes, and use a knife to roughly break them up in the cans so they're chunky. Add to beef and vegetables. Add the other canned ingredients, stirring after each addition. Add the spices. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low and simmer for 40 minutes, uncovered.

  • 3. Taste your chili. If it seems lacking, first add salt, 1/4 tsp at a time. This will bring out the characteristics of the other flavors and spices. You may need to make adjustments to the heat level because the spiciness of peppers can vary. If it's not spicy enough, add a little cayenne pepper, 1/8 tsp at a time.

  • CROCK POT:

  • 1. Brown beef and sausage on stovetop, then drain off fat.

  • 2. Layer bottom of crock pot with onions, peppers, hot peppers, and spices, and browned meat.

  • 3. Drain beans and tomatoes, and stir together all canned ingredients in a bowl before gently pouring on top of layered meat and veggies.

  • 4. Cook on low for 8 hours or high for 4. Give a good stir, and follow step three of stovetop directions to adjust seasonings.

Tips

I believe Hungarian paprika is superior to the regular grocery store variety. It ranges from "Hot" to "Sweet." Hot isn't super spicy, just more robust and pungent than the sweet variety, which has a more delicate, less assertive flavor. It is slightly more moist and infinitely more flavorful, whichever kind you choose. If you don't have access to it, regular paprika is fine, but reduce the amount to 1TB since it isn't adding much flavor, just beautiful color.

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