This week, the "butter's back" crowd gets rebuffed, new research gives unsaturated fats additional props, Americans and nutritionists differ on what's healthy, and more top stories on food science and healthy eating. And don't miss the quiz!

1) Butter's back? Well, maybe not so fast. Harvard's Nutrition Source says no way! And then says it again: "We Repeat: Butter Is Not Back" reads the headline of their recent article, in which they explain what the meta-analysis really suggests -- quoting the study's senior author: ""overall, our results suggest that butter should neither be demonized nor considered ‘back' as a route to good health."

2)

And we're not done with fats. A study links "good" fats -- like olive oil and other unsaturated fats -- with a likelihood for living a longer, healthier life.


Related: Add These Healthy Fats Back into Your Diet


3) The NYT surveyed nutritionists as well as regular ol' Americans about which foods they considered healthy. The results will surprise.

4)

Here's how science can help make difficult choices on healthy eating a little easier.

5)

Into healthy snacking? How about chips made from finely ground crickets? How about dehydrated beef organs? (From grass-fed cattle, of course.) The LA Times has the story on this new trend in healthy snacks.

6)

It's hot out there! Better drink your milk. Here are the best ways to stay hydrated, according to a new "beverage hydration index" that offers evidence-based suggestions, some of which you might find surprising.


Related: What are the Real Health Benefits of Infused Water?


7) You know those "best by" dates on milk and egg cartons, etc.? They're not actually expiration dates. CNN Health explains.

8)

Watermelon is a favorite summer treat. It's also a smart, healthy choice. The NYT takes a look at all the ways watermelon is a winner.


Related: 5 Healthy Ways to Eat — And Drink — More Watermelon


9) Some foods are actually healthier for you when cooked. Carrots are a case in point. Berkeley Wellness gets to the root of the issues.

10)

Pasta gets a reprieve? New research links noodles eaten in moderation with lower BMIs (Body Mass Index).

11)

Take the weekly health quiz from The New York Times.

Miss last week's list? We gotcha.


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