March Produce Guide: What's In Season Now?

Here’s your ultimate guide to March produce, including buying tips, storage hacks, and seasonal recipes.

Directly above shot of various vegetables on green table
Photo: Monica Olteanu / Getty Images

The arrival of March means spring is here – and we couldn't be happier. The season of new beginnings brings warming temperatures, sunny skies, colorful blooms, and lots of fresh produce. Need a little seasonal inspiration for the kitchen? We've put together a comprehensive list of the fruits and veggies you should look out for in March (including our best buying tips, storage hacks, and recipes):

list of seasonal March fruits and vegetables
Allrecipes Illustrations

Arugula

fresh arugula leaves
Meredith

Usher in springtime with crisp, peppery, and delicate arugula. The leafy green is commonly associated with salads, but it's also a great addition to pestos, soups, pastas, and more.

What to Look For

Opt for bright green leaves that look fresh and unwilted. Avoid anything that looks wet, discolored, or spotty.

Storage

Wrap unwashed arugula leaves in paper towels to keep them as dry as possible, then place them in an airtight storage bag or container. Keep them in the crisper drawer of your fridge for up to five days.

Recipes

Fig and Arugula Salad
France C

Explore our entire collection of Arugula Recipes.

Artichokes

fresh artichokes in a bowl
Meredith

You can use canned artichoke hearts all year long, but there's something special about a sweet, crunchy, in-season artichoke. Fresh artichokes are often cooked whole – steam them, stuff them, or throw them on the grill.

What to Look For

Choose an artichoke that feels firm and heavy for its size. The leaves should be tightly packed in a closed head. If the stem is slimy or dry and shriveled, toss it.

Storage

Artichokes do best in the fridge, but they need room to breathe. Store them in a perforated bag or loosely wrapped plastic. Stored correctly, they'll last for about a week.

Recipe

Sicilian Stuffed Artichokes
Buckwheat Queen

Asparagus

102190049-fresh-raw-asparagus-photo-by-meredith-650x465
Meredith

Asparagus is pretty much the spring veggie. Whether you use fresh asparagus stalks in a simple side dish, cook them into a quiche, or stir them into pasta sauce, you definitely don't want to let asparagus season pass you by.

What to Look For

Look for plump, firm, crisp asparagus. The stalks should be uniform in size, vibrantly colored, and have tightly packed stems.

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Storage

Treat your asparagus like a bouquet of flowers: Trim the woody bottoms and store the stalks stem-side down in a shallow glass or jar of water. Cover the heads loosely with plastic or storage wrap, then store the "bouquet" in the fridge for about a week. Replace the water every few days.

Recipes

Oven-Roasted Asparagus
Kim's Cooking Now!

Explore our entire collection of Asparagus Recipes.

Green Peas

Peas of all varieties are in season at the farmers market. Photo by Meredith
Meredith

As useful as frozen green peas are, spring is the time to skip the freezer aisle and take advantage of the fresh stuff. Pair just-peeled green peas with all your favorite dishes to add a little color to your plate.

What to Look For

Fresh green peas are usually sold inside their shells. The peels should be firm, shiny, and evenly green. Discoloration is a sign the peas might be past their prime.

Storage

Don't peel your peas until right before you prepare them. Wrap the unshelled peas in a wet paper towel, place them in an airtight container, and store them in the fridge for about three days.

Recipes

Italian Peas
Photo by Allrecipes Magazine.

Explore our entire collection of Green Pea Recipes.

Leeks

Leeks in a basket
Meredith

Searching for a spring veggie you can use in everything from cozy soups to fresh salads? Look no further than aromatic leeks. They add mild, onion-like flavor to all your favorite seasonal dishes.

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What to Look For

Buy leeks that are on the smaller side, as this means they're likely more flavorful than their larger counterparts. Look for firm white necks with deep green tops.

Storage

Don't wash or trim the leeks until you plan to use them. Store them, loosely wrapped, in the fridge for about two weeks. If you plan to use them within a day or two, you can keep them at room temperature.

Recipes

smooth potato and leek soup with chives and cream garnish
Chef John

Explore our entire collection of Leek Recipes.

Pineapples

Topped pineapple on cutting board with knife
Photo by Meredith.

Brighten your spring with a sweet, juicy, and wonderfully tropical fresh pineapple. Whether you use it in fruity desserts, bright salads, or stir the juice into barbecue sauce for an extra burst of sweetness.

What to Look For

Pick a pineapple that feels heavy for its size – this means it's extra sweet and juicy. You should also give the bottom of the pineapple a sniff. If it smells sweet, it's ripe. If it has no scent or smells vinegary, it is likely under- or overripe.

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Storage

Store a ripe, uncut pineapple at room temperature for about three days. You can also store it in the warmest part of your fridge (usually the door) for about six days. Cut pineapple chunks, meanwhile, should be stored in an airtight container in the fridge for five to seven days.

Recipes

Fresh Pineapple Salsa in a white bowl
lutzflcat

Explore our entire collection of Pineapple Recipes.

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